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In order to keep your Wifi network secure you may need to change your Xfinity Wifi password. Here are a couple of different ways to get that completed. 
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EXPORT   Identity Safe Data If you use Identity Safe, before you uninstall NSS you will want to go into Settings > Identity Protection > Log into Identity Safe by clicking on Configure (if not already logged-in) You will be interested in the Export Data option - you can click on Configure and will be permitted to browse your system for a location to save the data to.  You can create an Identity Safe BU folder in my Documents or on your desktop - but the choice of location is yours.  Select a location you will remember.   IMPORT   Identity Safe Data. Once NSS is installed, go back to the Identity Protection Settings page (above) and Select Import Data by clicking configure.  If you set a password when you saved the data, enter that password, the location of where you saved the data and then click OK.  Your Identity Safe data should be restored to what you had before you uninstalled Norton.
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Please note:  These instructions should also be followed if changing from one Norton product to another. ie a paid/trial subscription from Norton to the Comcast version, or a version upgrade of NSS which is more than one upgrade old.   If you use Identity Safe, backup your Identity Safe data (See Export instructions here-   http://forums.comcast.net/t5/Security-and-Anti-Virus/How-to-Export-Import-NSS-Identity-Safe-Data/m-p...     Uninstall NSS via normal removal procedures. (Add/Remove programs )   After it is uninstalled, run the Norton Remove and Reinstall Tool following the instructions here:  http://us.norton.com/support/kb/web_view.jsp?wv_type=public_web&selected_nav=partner&pvid=&docurl=20...   After running the Removal Tool, reboot and download and install a fresh copy of NSS from here:  http://constantguard.comcast.net/norton?cid=NET_33_601   Once installation is complete, open NSS and manually Run LiveUpdate (located on drop-down under PC Security on left side of main page of NSS) as many times as necessary for it to respond "no more updates available". If a reboot is requested, reboot and then continue to Run LiveUpdate until it responds "no more updates available" and then reboot one last time.  Your installation should now be up to date definition wise and ready for use.   After installation and update, complete the Import portion of the instructions here for Identity Safe Data here -   http://forums.comcast.net/t5/Security-and-Anti-Virus/How-to-Export-Import-NSS-Identity-Safe-Data/m-p...
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If you use Identity Safe, backup your Identity Safe data See Export instructions here  http://forums.comcast.net/t5/Security-and-Anti-Virus/How-to-Export-Import-NSS-Identity-Safe-Data/m-p...     Uninstall NSS via normal removal procedures. (Add/Remove programs ) Please Note:  During the uninstall of NSS, you should select the top option "I plan to reinstall a Norton Product in the future.  Please leave my settings behind."  The reason for the backup (Export/Import of ID Safe data) is a safety factor.     Follow the instructions found here:  http://constantguard.comcast.net/norton?cid=NET_33_601 to download and install a fresh copy of NSS.   Once installation is complete, open NSS and manually Run LiveUpdate (located on drop-down under PC Security on left side of main page of NSS) as many times as necessary for it to respond "no more updates available". If a reboot is requested, reboot and then continue to Run LiveUpdate until it responds "no more updates available" and then reboot one last time.  Your installation should now be up to date definition wise and ready for use.   After installation and update,if your Identity Safe data was not reinstalled, complete the Import portion of the instructions here for Identity Safe Data   http://forums.comcast.net/t5/Security-and-Anti-Virus/How-to-Export-Import-NSS-Identity-Safe-Data/m-p...
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  For those of you who have an anti-virus/security program/suite installed on your system, it is important to remove those programs prior to installing NSS.  It is recommended that the programs first be removed via Control Panel > Add/Remove Programs.  Once the program is removed, do a search for a Removal Tool for that program.  Many programs have removal tools available and insure a more thorough removal of the old program and a better chance of a clean install of NSS.   Here is a suggested link to assist with the removal: http://support.kaspersky.com/us/consumer/tools-utilities?_ga=1.54697835.1371605271.1460378651   Insure your Windows Firewall is turned on.   Turn off all your remaining anti-malware tools (except Windows Firewall) and reboot.   The Norton Security Suite,is available only for Comcast High Speed Internet customers.  You can go to the “Get Comcast Norton”  page   http://constantguard.comcast.net/norton?cid=NET_33_601 and confirm each of the prerequisites listed there and the minimum system requirements on subsequent pages. You may be required to logon with a Comcast.net Identifier that you use for Comcast Email or for this Forum before you download.   Please follow the instructions for installation and view the video for more clarification.   Once installation is complete, open NSS and manually Run LiveUpdate (located on drop-down under PC Security left side of main page of NSS) as many times as necessary for it to respond "no more updates available". If a reboot is requested, reboot and then continue to Run LiveUpdate until it responds "no more updates available" and then reboot one last time.  Your installation should now be up to date definition wise and ready for use.   If any problems/questions feel free to start a new thread on the Anti-Virus Software & Internet Security Board and we'll provide assistance.
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How do I log into my XFINITY modem so I can manage my home network?
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This article explains how to disable the XFINITY WiFi Hotspots on your Comcast modem
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This article will explain what port forwarding is and how to use it on your in-home network. 
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We see many questions in the forums regarding port forwarding, so I have put together a primer to try to help those who are new to the concept.   WARNING: Port Forwarding exposes devices on your LAN to the Internet. If you DO NOT NEED to port forward, DON'T. This guide tells you how to and why you might need to port forward. The reader assumes any and all responsibility for any damage of, or intrusions into their network caused by port forwarding. What is Port Forwarding? Port forwarding is a mechanism used in IPv4 to allow a computer, smartphone, or other device (the SOURCE) outside your Comcast HSI connection to connect to a device on your LAN (the DESTINATION). A typical Comcast residential user network might look something like this: In this diagram, a Cable subscriber (you) has a webcam, NAS, or media server on the internal LAN behind his router/gateway. It is configured to listen on TCP port 8080, in this case. Other devices or game servers that you have may be configured to listen on a different (or many different) ports, but the principle is the same. Let's say that the subscriber (you) want to make that server available to a family member in a different location, so they can see your webcam, or look at pictures on your media server or NAS. In order to do that, your family member needs to be able to connect, often using a web browser, or a smartphone app. The problem is that your web server is on your LAN, protected by the firewall in your router, AND it has a private address, which cannot be used on the internet. The private subnets you will see most commonly are the 192.168.0.0 and 10.0.0.0 subnets. Subnetting is beyond the scope of this discussion, as most home routers are set up out-of-the-box to use one of these submets. Under normal circumstances, you will probably never have to change this. The problem lies in the fact that these subnets cannot be routed over the internet. Port Forwarding is intended to solve that problem.   As seen in the diagram, your home router (and you must have a router of some type to perform port forwarding) is provided with an address on the public internet by Comcast. Because of a shortage of IPv4 addresses, home routers use Network Address Translation (NAT) to allow you to connect a large number of devices to your router, and give them the ability to connect to other devices on the internet. This is done by assigning each requested connection from your LAN a TCP port, so the router can track the connection. The combination of the IP address and port number is called a socket. So, when you use your computer on your LAN to go to www.google.com, your computer (the source) sends a request using a random port (usually above port 1024) to the destination (www.google.com) on port 80 (the standard http port. Because of NAT, the Google server sees your source address as the WAN IP of your router. How, you may ask. is this related to Port Forwarding? Well, port forwarding is essentially the same process, but in reverse. Think of it as inbound NAT. You router has a public IP address, but by default, it doesn't listen on many ports. This is for security, so that someone on the internet cannot easily get on to your network. Now, you have a media server or an IP Camera that you want Granny to see, so you have to tell your router to listen on a port so that you can give Granny a link to it that she can put in her web browser (how she does that we will discuss later).   How do I set up Port Forwarding   First, you have to set up your router. There is an excellent website at http://portforward.com, which will walk you through the steps of how to forward ports on just about every known router, so I am not going to go into detail on any particular model. Suffice to say that when you set up port forwarding, you tell your router to listen on a particular port (in the case of the diagram, it is port 8080), and you also tell it where to send that traffic, when it sees it. In this case, the router is told to send all traffic it ses incoming on port 8080 to the internal device at 192.168.1.200. Below is an example of the screen for configuring a Custom port forwarding service on a Netgear WNDR3700. Other router screens will look different. This is just one example:   OK, so I have set it up...how does Granny get there... Granny has a computer with a web browser. Lets say you are letting her see your IP Camera. instead of port 80, your IP Camera is designed to listen on port 8080. Under normal circumstances, you would forward the same port externally as the device listens on, so you would set up your port forwarding to listen on the WAN interface on port 8080, and internally, send all port 8080 traffic to the IP address of your IP camera. Now, when Granny browses google.com, she just types inwww.google.com in her browser, and it goes there, right? That is because google.com is listening on a well-known port for http traffic (port 80), and browsers automatically know that you want to go to port 80. What they don't know is that your router is waiting to send traffic to your IP Camera on port 8080, so when you tell Granny how to get to your camera, if you are using any port other that 80, you MUST specify the port, and that you are using the http protocol. So, you would tell granny to put the following in her browser address bar: http://<yourWANIP>:8080   To find the WAN IP of your router, you can either look at the Status page in your router interface, or browse tohttp://whatismyip.com If you don't want to give her an IP address, you would need to use some type of Dynamic DNS service (not within the scope of this discussion) to translate your WAN IP into a hostname, but you still need to specify http and the port number, like this: http://myipcam.somedomain.org:2000 (the actual name will depend on your Dynamic DNS provider) What else can I do with Port Forwarding?   The principles are the same for pretty much any device or server that you want to make available to sources outside your home. You can port forward Windows Remote Desktop Protocol, so you can log into your PC from another device with an RDP client. You can run a web server (although publicly accessible webservers are technically against the Comcast AUP for residential connections), you can access your own media server from your smartphone, so you can listen to your music wherever you are...the possibilities are pretty much endless, BUT make sure that you secure the devices you are allowing access to with strong passwords. While many security experts frown upon the concept of 'Security by Obscurity' I personally don't see that it hurts to change the port you are using for some services, especially the more common ones...Any hacker knows that Windows Remote Desktop Protocol runs on port 3389, so instead of setting your port forwarding up to listen on port 3389 on the WAN IP, use a different port (above 1024 is recommended. The highest you can go is 65535). You can still tell the router to forward the traffic to port 3389, so you don't have to mess around with the registry settings for your RDP setup on your Windows machine. That is basic port forwarding in brief. If you have any questions, please post it in the forums in the Home Networking / Router / & WiFi Gateway Help board and we will try to help. Be aware that as of writing this (April 2013) there appear to be some issues with port forwarding on some of the Comcast supplied gateway devices. Unfortunately, there isn't much we can do to remedy those, if you have set up port forwarding properly. The suggested solution is to have the gateway placed in bridge mode, and buy your own router to do your port forwarding. Also there are some quirks to setting up port forwarding on the SBG6580 gateway. See this post for details: http://forums.comcast.com/t5/Home-Networking-Router-WiFi/Port-Forwarding-for-an-IP-Camera/m-p/152957... ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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This article provides configuration settings for connecting your comcast.net to an email client
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Learn about what a home network is and why you need one.
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If you want to give other members of your household access to your XFINITY account, you can create a distinct username for each of them online. Additional XFINITY Usernames You can add up to six additional XFINITY usernames to your account. To create a new XFINITY username: Sign in to   My Account   as the primary user. Click the   Users   tab at the top of the page.   Underneath the current user portals, select the option to   Add a New User.   Fill out the   Add a New User   form with the new user's information.   On the same page, indicate if the new user is under 12 years old. If so, you must agree to the   COPPA Terms of Service. (Note:   Learn more about   The Children's Online Privacy Protection Act.)   Review the   Terms of Service   and the   Privacy Policy   by clicking on the links provided. If you agree, check the   I have read and agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy   box.   Click   Add user. Note:   When you create a new user, the user won't have any   Permissions   to access or modify account settings and can only utilize some account features, like watching XFINITY TV online and using email (if you have XFINITY TV and Internet). Learn how to   set secondary XFINITY username permissions. 
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This article provides detailed information about Comcast provided Wireless Gateways and their features. 
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This article explains what XFINITY On Demand is and how to use it
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This article tells you how to troubleshoot your WiFi Network using XFINITY xFi
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This article will provide you directions on how to set up a Home Page when using Windows 10 EDGE
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How to import your Favorites into Windows EDGE Browser
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