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 I have no Internet access and  the US and DS buttons on the modem are blinking. How do I solve this?
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This article provides you with some tips for troubleshooting your XFINITY Internet connection
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This article will explain what port forwarding is and how to use it on your in-home network. 
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This article provides information on how to complete your XFINITY Wireless Gateway Self Install and Activation
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This article explains what XFINITY On Demand is and how to use it
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How to turn Bridge Mode on and off on Xfinity modem
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How do I log into my XFINITY modem so I can manage my home network?
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This article provides configuration settings for connecting your comcast.net to an email client
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How to connect to an Xfinity WiFi Hotspot
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This article helps explains how to tell when a "Comcast" email is real or fraud
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This article provides detailed information about Comcast provided Wireless Gateways and their features. 
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If you want to give other members of your household access to your master Xfinity account, you can create up to six distinct usernames online. By adding a user, you allow him or her access to manage your Xfinity services (billing, account information, etc.) and access your subscriptions such as X1 TV viewing. You can adjust individual permissions. Each account user must reside at the premises where the Xfinity services are provided.      Add or Invite a New User to Your Account Sign in to   My Account   as the primary user. Click or touch the   Users   tab at the top of the page. Underneath the current user portals, select the option to   Add a New User. Select the   Create credentials   option and click   Continue. Alternately, choose   Send email invitation   and follow the instructions below. Fill out the form with the new user's details, including their first and last name, a unique username and a password. Click or touch   Continue. **Note**:   Passwords must be 8-16 characters with no spaces and contain at least one letter and one number or special character. Keep billing permissions toggled to   Off   to grant basic account access. Toggle billing permissions to   On   to allow the new user access to view, manage and pay your bill. After making a selection, click   Continue. Set up a secret question and answer for username/password recovery purposes, and then click   Create Account. A confirmation message will appear, showing you the newly added user along with their username and newly created email address.     Invite a New User to Your Account via Email In addition to creating an account for the new user, you can add a new username via an email invitation, which will allow the user to create their own Xfinity account. Sign into   My Account   as the primary user. Click the   Users   tab at the top of the page. Underneath the list of current users, click   Add A New User. Select   Send email invitation   and click or touch   Continue. Fill out the form with the new user's details, including their first and last name and email address. Click or touch   Continue. Select one of the verification methods (either text message or service address ZIP code) and click   Continue. This will be used by the invited user to confirm their identity. To give the new user permission to view, manage or pay your bill, toggle billing permissions to   On   and click   Invite User. A confirmation message will appear, and the new user will receive an email invitation to create their account. Next, the new user will need to accept their invitation via text message or by entering the household's ZIP code. **Note**:   After entering their mobile phone number, the new user will have 15 minutes to enter the verification code that they received via text message. Once the invited user confirms their account by text or by entering their ZIP code, they will be prompted to set up their username, password and password recovery method. Once the forms are completed, the new user account will be created. **Note**:   If no action is taken within 72 hours of the invitation being sent, the primary user of the account must make a new invitation request.        How to Suspend or Remove a User - My Account Help Suspending a user:   All Comcast access and services for this user will be suspended for a 90-day period. You may reactivate the user at any time during this period. If you do not reactivate the account, it will be subject to deletion. Removing a user:   This permanently deletes a secondary user, and all settings and preferences for this user will be erased. When you delete a username, you'll likely lose emails, voicemails, and other information associated with the username. Be sure to print or save copies of anything you want to keep. **Note**:   If this user has made scheduled payments, those will need to be cancelled prior to removing the user.   Sign in to   My Account   as the primary user. Click the   Users   tab on the top bar. Locate the user who you wish to suspend or remove, and click   Edit   to the right of their name. Click   Suspend   to temporarily deactivate the chosen user, or click   Remove   to permanently delete the user from your account.   A new window will appear. To confirm your decision to suspend, click   Suspend User. To confirm removing the selected user, click the   Delete User   button. Once successful, you will be taken to a confirmation page.       Learn more about How to Add and Invite Users to Your Xfinity Subscriber Account Learn more about How to Suspend or Remove a Secondary User 
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This article explains how to disable the XFINITY WiFi Hotspots on your Comcast modem
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Many factors may impact WiFi connectivity in your home. Take the following into consideration for better WiFi performance: Check Gateway/Router Placement Place your Gateway, modem or router in the most central location of your home, preferably on the main floor instead of the attic or basement. Make sure it is at least a couple of feet off of the floor and confirm that the coax cable connection is finger tight. Avoid putting your Gateway or router in cramped spaces or next to anything that can block the WiFi signal. The best position is in an open space away from thick surfaces (e.g., concrete walls) and other household electronics that may cause interference with the WiFi signal, such as baby monitors, cordless phones, microwave ovens, refrigerators and Bluetooth-connected devices. **Note**:   Consider adding Xfinity xFi Pods to help extend your home WiFi coverage throughout your home. To learn more and purchase, go to   xfinity.com/xfipods. Regularly Reboot Your Equipment Rebooting (or restarting) your Gateway, modem or router is good for the device's health and for your home WiFi performance. Doing this allows the device to update its software, if necessary, which can help optimize your connection and speed. Learn   how to restart your WiFi equipment. Confirm Your WiFi Network Sometimes you may be connected to your Gateway's public WiFi hotspot network (xfinitywifi) or secure hotspot network (XFINITY), which can limit your WiFi speed. Go to the WiFi settings of your device to make sure you're connected to your personal in-home WiFi network. Connect High-Bandwidth Devices via Ethernet Whenever possible, plugging stationary devices directly into your Gateway or router using an Ethernet cable may provide optimal connectivity. For example, it's ideal for desktop computers, gaming consoles and video streaming devices to be connected with an Ethernet cable instead of connecting wirelessly, since activities on those devices use a lot of bandwidth (e.g., graphic-rich online gaming, movies or TV shows). Check Bridge Mode and Antennae for Third-Party Routers If you use your own router along with your Gateway, make sure the Gateway is in bridge mode. Learn more about   bridge mode. You'll also want to position the antennae of your router so that one is pointing vertically (12 o'clock), and the other one is pointing horizontally (either 3 or 9 o'clock) to broadcast the strongest signal. Consider a Different Speed Option If many devices access your home WiFi network at the same time, you may want to consider a higher speed tier to improve your network's performance. We offer several speed options to serve your needs. Visit My Account to see which level of Internet service you have and the upgrade options that are available. Other Factors That May Impact WiFi Connectivity: Technical limitations of personal devices (e.g., an older phone that can't handle faster speeds, out of date operating systems, etc.) The distance between personal devices and your Gateway/modem/router Older devices which could be consuming bandwidth and slowing down your network       Additional Resources For more information, refer to   Xfinity's in-home WiFi tip sheet. For details about staying connected to your home WiFi network, see how to   troubleshoot Xfinity Internet or WiFi connection. If your Gateway is several years old, it may be time to upgrade. Find out more about   upgrading your wireless network equipment. For additional information, refer to Improving your Xfinity WiFi.
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  This article outlines how to activate your Xfinity Internet/Xfinity Voice service if you rent an Xfinity xFi Gateway (Arris 1682G, Cisco 3941T, Arris 3482G, Technicolor CGM4140COM or Cisco DPC3939). To determine the type of Gateway you have, check the make and model information located on the bottom of your device. You can also log in to  My Account  and select  Devices  to view the make and model of your Gateway.   If you do not have an xFi-compatible Gateway, please see the activation instructions for other Wireless Gateway devices.       Activation Instructions Before you start: Download the Xfinity xFi app for free from the Apple App Store or Google Play. Launch the Xfinity xFi app and sign in using your Xfinity username and password. (You must be the primary or an unrestricted secondary user to access.) Select   I'm setting up my Wireless Gateway. After activation you can continue to use the Xfinity xFi app to manage your home network. Select   Get Started   to begin the process of setting up your Gateway. The entire process should not take longer than 20 minutes.   Select   Use Camera   to scan the QR code on the side or back of the device. The QR code should contain all of the information needed to begin activation. You may also be prompted to grant the Xfinity xFi app permission to access your smartphone's camera.   Note:   If your device does not have a QR code to scan, you will need to enter the 12-digit CM MAC number found on the side or back of the Gateway. Select   Enter Code Manually   and follow the on-screen prompts. You may also be prompted to enter the CM MAC number even if your device has a QR code if we need additional information. Your smartphone's camera will open within the Xfinity xFi app. Find the QR code and focus the camera on it. Once the QR code has been successfully scanned, you will see a green check mark. Note:   Keep your smartphone as steady as possible. If the camera has trouble focusing on the QR code, try slowly moving your smartphone away from and towards the QR code. The app will then take you through the necessary steps to set up your Gateway (modem/router) and activate your Xfinity Internet/Xfinity Voice service. For the best WiFi coverage, set up the device in the most centrally located place in your home where there is also a cable outlet. Also, avoid placing the device in your basement or attic as this can interfere with your WiFi signal. Keep it out of cabinets or closets, and make sure it is off of the floor. Select   Next   to proceed through these tips. Once you've found the best spot for your Gateway, follow the instructions to connect the coaxial cable and power cord. The lights on the front of your Gateway will flash and blink as the device prepares for activation. Select   Ready to Go!   to continue.   Now that your Gateway is connected, it's time to personalize your home WiFi network name and password. Enter a WiFi name and password that is easy to remember and secure. Select   Next. Confirm the WiFi name and password you entered are correct. If you need to make changes, simply select the back arrow in the top left-hand corner of the screen. If you are also activating Xfinity Voice, you will see your phone number on this screen. Select   Confirm and Finish Up. Note:   For customers swapping an existing xFi Gateway with a new one, you may be presented with the WiFi name and password associated with your previous device. You can choose to keep them the same, or create a new WiFi name and password. If you change the name/password, you'll need to reconnect all your devices using the new information. Your home network setup will now begin. This can take up to 10 minutes to complete. You will also be prompted to enable push notifications to be alerted when activation is complete. Once your Gateway is activated and your WiFi is ready to go, you'll be presented with instructions on how to connect to your new WiFi network. Two shortcuts are provided to make this process even easier. Simply copy your WiFi password to your clipboard by selecting   Copy   and then   Go to Settings. From there, go to the WiFi settings on your device, wait for your new WiFi name to show in the list of available networks, join the network and then paste your password to connect. Remember, you'll need to connect all of your WiFi-enabled devices using the WiFi name and password you created. Select   Continue to XFINITY xFi   to access home network personalization and control features, for example the ability to see who's most active on your network, troubleshoot any connection issues, and block inappropriate content and network threats. To learn more about xFi features, see the   overview for Xfinity xFi Web Portal and Mobile App.
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In order to keep your Wifi network secure you may need to change your Xfinity Wifi password. Here are a couple of different ways to get that completed. 
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How to find a compatible modem with your Xfinity Internet service
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***Created by our Community Users***     We see many questions in the forums regarding port forwarding, so I have put together a primer to try to help those who are new to the concept.   WARNING: Port Forwarding exposes devices on your LAN to the Internet. If you DO NOT NEED to port forward, DON'T. This guide tells you how to and why you might need to port forward. The reader assumes any and all responsibility for any damage of, or intrusions into their network caused by port forwarding. What is Port Forwarding? Port forwarding is a mechanism used in IPv4 to allow a computer, smartphone, or other device (the SOURCE) outside your Comcast HSI connection to connect to a device on your LAN (the DESTINATION). A typical Comcast residential user network might look something like this: In this diagram, a Cable subscriber (you) has a webcam, NAS, or media server on the internal LAN behind his router/gateway. It is configured to listen on TCP port 8080, in this case. Other devices or game servers that you have may be configured to listen on a different (or many different) ports, but the principle is the same. Let's say that the subscriber (you) want to make that server available to a family member in a different location, so they can see your webcam, or look at pictures on your media server or NAS. In order to do that, your family member needs to be able to connect, often using a web browser, or a smartphone app. The problem is that your web server is on your LAN, protected by the firewall in your router, AND it has a private address, which cannot be used on the internet. The private subnets you will see most commonly are the 192.168.0.0 and 10.0.0.0 subnets. Subnetting is beyond the scope of this discussion, as most home routers are set up out-of-the-box to use one of these submets. Under normal circumstances, you will probably never have to change this. The problem lies in the fact that these subnets cannot be routed over the internet. Port Forwarding is intended to solve that problem.   As seen in the diagram, your home router (and you must have a router of some type to perform port forwarding) is provided with an address on the public internet by Comcast. Because of a shortage of IPv4 addresses, home routers use Network Address Translation (NAT) to allow you to connect a large number of devices to your router, and give them the ability to connect to other devices on the internet. This is done by assigning each requested connection from your LAN a TCP port, so the router can track the connection. The combination of the IP address and port number is called a socket. So, when you use your computer on your LAN to go to www.google.com, your computer (the source) sends a request using a random port (usually above port 1024) to the destination (www.google.com) on port 80 (the standard http port. Because of NAT, the Google server sees your source address as the WAN IP of your router. How, you may ask. is this related to Port Forwarding? Well, port forwarding is essentially the same process, but in reverse. Think of it as inbound NAT. You router has a public IP address, but by default, it doesn't listen on many ports. This is for security so that someone on the internet cannot easily get on to your network. Now, you have a media server or an IP Camera that you want Granny to see, so you have to tell your router to listen on a port so that you can give Granny a link to it that she can put in her web browser (how she does that we will discuss later).     How do I set up Port Forwarding   First, you have to set up your router. There is an excellent website at http://portforward.com, which will walk you through the steps of how to forward ports on just about every known router, so I am not going to go into detail on any particular model. Suffice to say that when you set up port forwarding, you tell your router to listen on a particular port (in the case of the diagram, it is port 8080), and you also tell it where to send that traffic, when it sees it. In this case, the router is told to send all traffic it ses incoming on port 8080 to the internal device at 192.168.1.200. Below is an example of the screen for configuring a Custom port forwarding service on a Netgear WNDR3700. Other router screens will look different. This is just one example:     Setting Up Port Forwarding in the Wireless Gateway Admin Tool   To turn on the port forwarding function on your gateway, follow the steps below to create a rule. Go to   http://10.0.0.1   using a device that is connected to your network. Log in to the Admin Tool: Username:   admin Password:   password   (unless you changed it) Select the   Advanced   menu in the left pane, then click   Port Forwarding. Select   Enable. The button will turn green. Click   +ADD SERVICE   in the   Port Forwarding   box. The   Add Service   page will appear.   Select the appropriate option (FTP, AIM, HTTP, PPTP), from the   Common Service   drop-down menu. Selecting one of these options will automatically populate the start and end ports below the   Common Service   field. For a service not listed, select   Other   and type   Service Name   in the field. Select the   Service Type. The Service Type is the protocol used for sending data over the Internet. The default is   TCP/UDP.   Click   CONNECTED DEVICE   to select the device on your network and populate these fields for the   IPv4 Address   or   IPv6 Address   fields. If the   CONNECTED DEVICE   button doesn't appear on the page: Open a new browser window, follow Steps 1 and 2 from above, and go to   Connected Devices > Devices, as shown below. Click the name of your device for which you want to add the port forwarding rule, under   Online Devices' Host Name. Highlight and copy the   IP address. Return to the previous browser window and paste the   IP address. The start and end ports will populate only if you selected one of the four Common Services. If not, enter the port numbers that are required for the game or service for which you want to add the port forwarding rule.   Click   Save. You have created a port forwarding rule on your home network, but before you log out of the   Admin Tool, take note of your WAN IP address (as seen below). You'll need this information to begin using the game or service.     OK, so I have set it up...how does Granny get there... Granny has a computer with a web browser. Lets say you are letting her see your IP Camera. instead of port 80, your IP Camera is designed to listen on port 8080. Under normal circumstances, you would forward the same port externally as the device listens on, so you would set up your port forwarding to listen on the WAN interface on port 8080, and internally, send all port 8080 traffic to the IP address of your IP camera. Now, when Granny browses google.com, she just types inwww.google.com in her browser, and it goes there, right? That is because google.com is listening on a well-known port for http traffic (port 80), and browsers automatically know that you want to go to port 80. What they don't know is that your router is waiting to send traffic to your IP Camera on port 8080, so when you tell Granny how to get to your camera, if you are using any port other that 80, you MUST specify the port, and that you are using the http protocol. So, you would tell granny to put the following in her browser address bar: http://<yourWANIP>:8080   To find the WAN IP of your router, you can either look at the Status page in your router interface, or browse tohttp://whatismyip.com If you don't want to give her an IP address, you would need to use some type of Dynamic DNS service (not within the scope of this discussion) to translate your WAN IP into a hostname, but you still need to specify http and the port number, like this: http://myipcam.somedomain.org:2000 (the actual name will depend on your Dynamic DNS provider)   What else can I do with Port Forwarding?   The principles are the same for pretty much any device or server that you want to make available to sources outside your home. You can port forward Windows Remote Desktop Protocol, so you can log into your PC from another device with an RDP client. You can run a web server (although publicly accessible webservers are technically against the Comcast AUP for residential connections), you can access your own media server from your smartphone, so you can listen to your music wherever you are...the possibilities are pretty much endless, BUT make sure that you secure the devices you are allowing access to with strong passwords. While many security experts frown upon the concept of 'Security by Obscurity' I personally don't see that it hurts to change the port you are using for some services, especially the more common ones...Any hacker knows that Windows Remote Desktop Protocol runs on port 3389, so instead of setting your port forwarding up to listen on port 3389 on the WAN IP, use a different port (above 1024 is recommended. The highest you can go is 65535). You can still tell the router to forward the traffic to port 3389, so you don't have to mess around with the registry settings for your RDP setup on your Windows machine. That is basic port forwarding in brief. If you have any questions, please post it in the forums in the Home Networking / Router / & WiFi Gateway Help board and we will try to help.     Is your device currently connected to your home network?   If the device is not currently connected to your home network, adding a port forward may not work. Try connecting your device to your home network and then setting up the desired port forward. Connecting to your network first will ensure the device has a valid DHCP address within the DHCP range for port forwarding.     Are port forwards you previously set up not appearing in xFi? When attempting to set up a port forward, are you receiving a message that we’re having some trouble, or that the port you are trying to set up already exists?     If you have previously set up a port forward but it is not appearing in xFi, or when attempting to set up a port forward, you are receiving a message that we’re having some trouble, or that the port already exists, editing your LAN settings may resolve the issue. This will clear any pre-existing port forwards that may not be appearing in xFi but are causing issues, and should allow you to successfully set up new port forwards. Any small adjustment made to your LAN settings should be enough to clear existing port forwards. Once the changes have been applied, you can immediately change the settings back to the previous if desired.  Once completed, try setting up your port forwards as desired.      Have your LAN settings recently changed?   If you changed your LAN settings, port forwards you previously set up will no longer work. You will need to set up your port forwards again.     Does the device you’re attempting to set up a port forward for have an IPv6 address?   xFi does not currently allow you to set up port forward for devices that have an IPv6 address since port forwarding should not be needed for these devices.  If the device is dual stack (has both an IPv4 and IPv6 address) the IP recognized by xFi depends on which address your device defaults to. Port forwarding can only be configured in xFi if the device is using the IPv4 address. There are some quirks to setting up port forwarding on the SBG6580 gateway. See this post for details: http://forums.comcast.com/t5/Home-Networking-Router-WiFi/Port-Forwarding-for-an-IP-Camera/m-p/152957... ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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Differences between and Primary and Secondary users and how to manage them
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Details on the personalization and control features available with Xfinity xFi.
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