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Wired (Ethernet) networking

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Wired (Ethernet) networking

I have the xFi Advanced Gateway it only has 2 ethernet ports, I need 6. What do I need to use to expand a switch or just a plain hub?

 

Thank you.

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Re: Wired (Ethernet) networking


@melissafsacct wrote:

I have the xFi Advanced Gateway it only has 2 ethernet ports, I need 6. What do I need to use to expand a switch or just a plain hub?

 

Thank you.


This 8-port switch has worked great for me:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00C2H0YFU/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o06_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1


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Expert

Re: Wired (Ethernet) networking

Use an ethernet *switch*, not a dumb "hub".



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Re: Wired (Ethernet) networking

Do they even still make hubs?

For those wondering what the difference is: A hub repeats any data to ALL other ports. A switch keeps track of the MAC address and only copies data between the source and destination ports. A hubs total max speed is the basic Ethernet spec. A switch could, in theory, support greater since data is only moving from one port to another. That would assume multiple different computers talking to multiple other computers.

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Re: Wired (Ethernet) networking


@andyross wrote:

Do they even still make hubs?


My point to @RobertWy was made. Use correct terminology.

 

https://www.amazon.com/Netgear-EN104TP-4-Port-Ethernet-Uplink/dp/B00000J4M9



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Re: Wired (Ethernet) networking


@EG wrote:

Use an ethernet *switch*, not a dumb "hub".


Noted.


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Re: Wired (Ethernet) networking

People here muddying the waters 🤦🏻‍♂️
This is not complex or confusing.

All you need is a network switch e.g. Netgear Gs308.

Plug the switch into your gateway and everything you need extra Ethernet Ports for into to the switch.
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Re: Wired (Ethernet) networking


@RobertWy wrote:

@EG wrote:

Use an ethernet *switch*, not a dumb "hub".


Noted.


I see that you edited your post. Thanks for providing the clarification.



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Re: Wired (Ethernet) networking

You will want a gigabit switch.  I don't think anyone makes hubs anymore (hubs forward all packets to all ports, switches learn the destination devices).   The distinction between the cheap and expensive devices these days is whether the switch is 'smart', allowing configuration of VLANSs, monitor ports, etc.  Most people do not need such features in a home network (you wouldn't be asking questions here if you needed them), so the low cost switches are fine.

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Re: Wired (Ethernet) networking

“ I don't think anyone makes hubs anymore“

Netgear, Linksys, Tp-Link, Cisco, and others still manufacture Hubs.
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Re: Wired (Ethernet) networking


@lesmikesell wrote:

 I don't think anyone makes hubs anymore.


Sure do.



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Re: Wired (Ethernet) networking


@lesmikesell wrote:

You will want a gigabit switch.  


I think that they need a switch ! LOL !

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Re: Wired (Ethernet) networking

“ The distinction between the cheap and expensive devices these days is whether the switch is 'smart', allowing configuration of VLANSs, monitor ports, etc.“

Those are “managed switches”. Not “smart switches”.

See, https://searchnetworking.techtarget.com/answer/What-is-the-difference-between-a-managed-and-unmanage...
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Re: Wired (Ethernet) networking

“ You will want a gigabit switch.”
The Netgear GS308 in the example I gave is a gigabit Ethernet switch.
Valued Contributor

Re: Wired (Ethernet) networking


@alienist wrote:
“ I don't think anyone makes hubs anymore“

Netgear, Linksys, Tp-Link, Cisco, and others still manufacture Hubs.

Gigabit?   How would that work?  I thought part of the gigabit spec was negotiating speed, and an hub with mixed speed ports would have a serious problem forwarding everything everywhere.

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Re: Wired (Ethernet) networking

“ Gigabit? How would that work? I thought part of the gigabit spec was negotiating speed, and an hub with mixed speed ports would have a serious problem forwarding everything everywhere.”

You are conflating two separate comments and completely misunderstanding Gigabit Ethernet networking.
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Re: Wired (Ethernet) networking

@RobertWy TEG-S82G is a good switch.
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Re: Wired (Ethernet) networking


@alienist wrote:
@RobertWy TEG-S82G is a good switch.

Thank you.  I have two, one downstream from the other, which is connected to my XB6 in Bridge Mode.


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Re: Wired (Ethernet) networking


@RobertWy wrote:


Thank you.  I have two, one downstream from the other, which is connected to my XB6 in Bridge Mode.


If the XB6 was truly in bridge mode, there would be only one public IP address available. How could it work for multiple devices ?



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Re: Wired (Ethernet) networking


@RobertWy wrote:


Thank you.  I have two, one downstream from the other, which is connected to my XB6 in Bridge Mode.


If the XB6 was truly in bridge mode, there would be only one public IPaddress available. How could the switch  work for multiple devices ?



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Re: Wired (Ethernet) networking


@EG wrote:

@RobertWy wrote:


Thank you.  I have two, one downstream from the other, which is connected to my XB6 in Bridge Mode.


If the XB6 was truly in bridge mode, there would be only one public IPaddress available. How could the switch  work for multiple devices ?


I wish I understood your question.  The XB6 provides unique IP addresses to each connected device, I presume, because I can query each device and they have an IP address.

I PRESUME the XB6 sees all my ethernet devices on its single ethernet port.

 

10.0.0.1
- Name: XB6
- Properties: Pingable, UPnP, Gateway, Web interface
- DNS Name: Docsis-Gateway.hsd1.tx.comcast.net

10.0.0.25
- Name: RBS50-2
- Vendor: Model Roon
- Properties: Pingable, Web interface
- DNS Name: RBS50-5.hsd1.tx.comcast.net

10.0.0.38
- Name: DESKTOP-CBAI5AM-2
- IPv6 Addresses: 2601:2c6:4f00:350::4f8a
- Properties: Pingable, Bonjour
- mDNS Name: DESKTOP-CBAI5AM-2.local
- LLMNR Name: DESKTOP-CBAI5AM
- NetBIOS Name: DESKTOP-CBAI5AM
- NetBIOS Domain: USAHOU
- DNS Name: DESKTOP-CBAI5AM-11.hsd1.tx.comcast.net

10.0.0.40
- Name: Base Station
- Vendor: AcuRite
- Properties: Pingable, Web interface
- DNS Name: W550-0A7A94.hsd1.tx.comcast.net

10.0.0.47
- Name: All-In-One
- Vendor: HP
- Properties: Pingable, UPnP, Bonjour
- DNS Name: Chromecast-Ultra.hsd1.tx.comcast.net

10.0.0.48
- Name: Orbi Router
- Vendor: Netgear
- Properties: Pingable, Web interface
- DNS Name: RBR50.hsd1.tx.comcast.net

10.0.0.55
- Name: iPad.hsd1.tx.comcast.net
- DNS Name: iPad.hsd1.tx.comcast.net

10.0.0.64
- Name: iPad-Pro
- IPv6 Addresses: fe80::1882:d7ac:d741:f9cf
- Properties: Pingable, Bonjour
- mDNS Name: iPad-Pro.local
- DNS Name: iPad-Pro.hsd1.tx.comcast.net

10.0.0.69
- Name: Tablet
- Vendor: Samsung
- Properties: Pingable
- DNS Name: Galaxy-Tab-A-9.hsd1.tx.comcast.net

10.0.0.121
- Name: RBS50-1
- Vendor: Kitchen
- Properties: Pingable, Web interface
- DNS Name: RBS50.hsd1.tx.comcast.net

10.0.0.141
- Name: SVF13N17PXS
- Properties: Pingable, UPnP
- mDNS Name: SVF13N17PXS.local
- LLMNR Name: SVF13N17PXS
- NetBIOS Name: SVF13N17PXS
- NetBIOS Domain: USAHOU
- DNS Name: SVF13N17PXS.hsd1.tx.comcast.net

10.0.0.143
- Name: [TV]UN60D7000
- Properties: Pingable, UPnP

10.0.0.149
- Name: DESKTOP-TU92KIH
- Properties: Pingable, UPnP
- LLMNR Name: DESKTOP-TU92KIH
- NetBIOS Name: DESKTOP-TU92KIH
- NetBIOS Domain: USAHOU
- DNS Name: DESKTOP-TU92KIH.hsd1.tx.comcast.net

10.0.0.166
- Name: JRW iPhone 11
- IPv6 Addresses: 2601:2c6:4f00:350:1c12:3c44:79c4:9e2e, 2601:2c6:4f00:350:cc95:890d:7d00:a5f7, 2601:2c6:4f00:350::4bf4, fe80::60:16c2:fcfc:9c02
- Vendor: Apple
- Properties: Pingable, Scanning device
- DNS Name: JRW-iPhone-11.hsd1.tx.comcast.net

10.0.0.174
- Name: HP Envy
- Vendor: HP
- Properties: Pingable, UPnP, Bonjour
- mDNS Name: DESKTOP-CBAI5AM-2.local
- LLMNR Name: DESKTOP-CBAI5AM
- NetBIOS Name: DESKTOP-CBAI5AM
- NetBIOS Domain: USAHOU
- DNS Name: DESKTOP-CBAI5AM.hsd1.tx.comcast.net

10.0.0.176
- Name: PS4-B21DF4
- Properties: Pingable, Bonjour
- mDNS Name: PS4-B21DF4.local

10.0.0.188
- Properties: Pingable

10.0.0.208
- Name: Printer
- Vendor: Brother
- Properties: Pingable, Bonjour, Web interface
- mDNS Name: BRW485AB67E572F.local
- LLMNR Name: BRW485AB67E572F
- NetBIOS Name: BRW485AB67E572F
- DNS Name: BRW485AB67E572F.hsd1.tx.comcast.net

10.0.0.210
- Name: Galaxy-Tab-A.hsd1.tx.comcast.net
- Properties: Pingable
- DNS Name: Galaxy-Tab-A.hsd1.tx.comcast.net

10.0.0.226
- Name: Vizio TV
- Properties: Pingable, UPnP, Bonjour
- mDNS Name: viziocasttv.local
- DNS Name: viziocastdisplay.hsd1.tx.comcast.net

10.0.0.229
- Properties: Pingable, UPnP

10.0.0.236
- Name: ECW-iPhone-11
- IPv6 Addresses: fe80::846:7586:d605:a798
- Properties: Pingable, Bonjour
- mDNS Name: ECW-iPhone-11.local
- DNS Name: ECW-iPhone-11.hsd1.tx.comcast.net

10.0.0.252
- Name: Chromecast
- Properties: Pingable, Bonjour
- mDNS Name: Chromecast.local
- DNS Name: VIZIOCastAudio2172.hsd1.tx.comcast.net


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Re: Wired (Ethernet) networking

Well then it's not in bridge mode if it's handing out those private (10.x.x.x) IP addresses.



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Re: Wired (Ethernet) networking


@EG wrote:

Well then it's not in bridge mode if it's handing out those private (10.x.x.x) IP addresses.


You are correct; when I was setting up my Orbi I had to turn OFF Bridge Mode and turned OFF Wifi.

My memory forgot what I actually did.

Thank you.


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Re: Wired (Ethernet) networking

@RobertWy you connected the switch to your xfinity gateway using bridge mode? 🤨
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Re: Wired (Ethernet) networking


@alienist wrote:
@RobertWy you connected the switch to your xfinity gateway using bridge mode? 🤨

He stated: "I had to turn OFF Bridge Mode"

 

As you know, bridge mode must be off in order to be able to connect multiple devices to a switch. His gateway is assigning private IP addresses to his LAN.



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Re: Wired (Ethernet) networking

@EG I know what a router does. Thanks though. 😊
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Re: Wired (Ethernet) networking

@EG you making this more complicated than it is. Enabling bridge mode disables the WiFi router built in allowing the end user to use an off the shelf Ethernet router and/or WiFi router with his or her xfinity gateway.
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Re: Wired (Ethernet) networking


@alienist wrote:
@EG you making this more complicated than it is.

You've said that to someone else the other day. Maybe you are the one that's muddying the waters ???

Enabling bridge mode disables the WiFi router built in allowing the end user to use an off the shelf Ethernet router and/or WiFi router with his or her xfinity gateway.

 

@alienist  I also know what a router does. Thanks though. 😊

 

Enabling bridge mode not only turns off the WiFi, it also disables all routing / DHCP / NAT functions.

 

Really, LOLLL !!!

 

I think you are confused. Please re-read this thread... RobertWy stated that he was hanging a switch of of a gateway that was in bridge mode and all devices worked. That because in reality, it was not in bridge mode at all. The DHCP was handing out multiple private IP addresses...


 

 



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Re: Wired (Ethernet) networking

@EG you’re twisting my comment. I said, “WiFi router”. Not WiFi.
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Re: Wired (Ethernet) networking

@EG “disables all routing” that shouldn’t of needed to of be said because it was self-evident. A “WiFi router” does routing.
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Re: Wired (Ethernet) networking

OP has not returned. This thread has veered off topic and has run it's course and is therefore being closed. OP. If you still have an issue or question, please feel free to create a new topic.



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