Community Forum

What does it take to get faster upload speeds?

zmb94
New Poster

What does it take to get faster upload speeds?

5 Mpbs upload is annoyingly slow and downright unacceptable in 2020 when having to WFH from further notice. When will Comcast offer faster upload speeds on residential plans?

 

200 Mbps download is enough and I shouldn't have to pay for high-end residential or business service just to have enough bandwidth for 2 people to videoconference with.

 

For reference, I'm able to do 31.8 Mbps up on T-Mobile.

darkangelic
Expert

Re: What does it take to get faster upload speeds?

What do you consider an "acceptable" upload speed and a "high end" residential or business plan?


I am not a Comcast Employee.
I am a Customer Expert volunteering my time to help other customers here in the Forums.
We ask that you post publicly so people with similar questions may benefit from the conversation.
Was your question answered? Mark the post as Best Answer!
EG
Expert

Re: What does it take to get faster upload speeds?


@zmb94 wrote:

 

For reference, I'm able to do 31.8 Mbps up on T-Mobile.


FWIW, the current upstream / return path bandwidth spectrum allocation on DOCSIS is physically limited. It's the nature of the beast. This is why there isn't as much flexibility with offering faster upload speeds compared to the download. Apples and oranges can't be compared.



I am not a Comcast Employee.
I am a Customer Expert volunteering my time to help other customers here in the Forums.
We ask that you post publicly so people with similar questions may benefit from the conversation.
Was your question answered? Mark the post as Best Answer!
parker95340
New Poster

Re: What does it take to get faster upload speeds?

Do you have any evidence to back this up? The DOCSIS 3.0 Spec allows for up to 24x8, which is a theoretical 1gbps down, and 246mbps up and this is found to be backed up by the fact that there are/were Gigabit certified DOCSIS 24x8 modems by ISPs before DOCSIS 3.1 was even available.

Even the 8x4 DOCSIS 3.0 modems can support up to 246mbps down and 123mbps up theoretical. Sure you won't get those speeds, but 123mbps is still much higher than the 35mbps UP that the current xfinity Gigabit plan provides. The current 1Gbit plan is on DOCSIS 3.1, which is 32x8, or 8 upstreams but still only offers 35mbps up. Not only that, but  comcast used to offer, and still has for grandfathered customers, a 250 Extreme plan that is/was 250 down and 250 UP. There doesn't seem to be any physical limitation reason why they can't have a plan that offers over 35mbps UP on the current DOCSIS 3.0 plan as is obvious by the fact that they had 250down/250up plans since many years ago which have now been discontinued. 

parker95340
New Poster

Re: What does it take to get faster upload speeds?

The Truth: https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2013/12/why-comcast-and-other-cable-isps-arent-sellin...

DOCSIS 3.0 requires modems to support at least four downstream and four upstream channels. In practice, a typical DOCSIS 3.0 modem bonds eight downstream channels and four upstream ones, providing data rates of about 300Mbps down and 100Mbps up.

DOCSIS 3.0 modems with 24 channels have existed for a while, though. Hitron unveiled a 24x8 (24 downstream channels, eight upstream channels) device back in May 2012. Netgear announced the certification of a 24-channel gateway a year ago. Modem manufacturers are dependent upon chipmakers such as Intel and Broadcom, who are now making 24- and 32-channel DOCSIS 3.0 chips that can provide gigabit bandwidth from a single chip.


parker95340
New Poster

Re: What does it take to get faster upload speeds?

There have been 24x8 DOCSIS 3.0 modems out since around 2012, which support around ~250mbps UP, which makes sense because comcast used to provide a 250down/250up Extreme plan long before DOCSIS 3.1 was around. The current Xfinity Gigabit plan is 1gbps down and only 35mbps UP! I'm sorry, but 35mbps UP is not even close to the limit of DOCSIS 3.0 limit of ~250mbps.

This is all almost moot anyway, since at least in my area, the gigabit plan recommends a DOCSIS 3.1 modem and a 32x8 for that matter (rated for 1gpbs UP)! So it's definitely NOT A PHYSICAL or PROTOCOL limitation whether you're on DOCSIS 3.0 or 3.1. Let's get that straight. It is an artificial and marketing decision to limit the upload speed anything below ~250mbps on DOCSIS 3.0, and anything below 1gbps on DOCSIS 3.1.

EG
Expert

Re: What does it take to get faster upload speeds?

Only with 3.1 but Comcast does not yet offer DOCSIS 3.1 for the upstream. A current single 64 QAM modulated, 6.4 MHz-wide, 5.120 MSym/sec upstream channel supports a raw data rate of approximately 30.72 Mbps and a real world throughput of approximately 27 Mbps. 27x3=81. 27x4=108. 100 is possible as long as no one else on a 300 or more customer node is not using bandwidth. Not happening. It is a shared medium. 200 will never be possible even with 8 channels. There is always inherent overhead.

 

Here is an informative article about the future for the upstream bandwidth capability for DOCSIS based systems;

http://www.multichannel.com/news/distribution/comcast-eyes-upstream-expansion-it-pulls-fiber-deeper/...

They do offer a 2 gigabit (with symmetrical speeds) FTTH (Fiber To The Home) service in some areas.


http://www.cablelabs.com/innovations/docsis3-1/

 

https://www.qorvo.com/design-hub/blog/enabling-10gbps-cable-networks-with-full-duplex-docsis-3-1



I am not a Comcast Employee.
I am a Customer Expert volunteering my time to help other customers here in the Forums.
We ask that you post publicly so people with similar questions may benefit from the conversation.
Was your question answered? Mark the post as Best Answer!
EG
Expert

Re: What does it take to get faster upload speeds?

And the article you linked to is a bit dated from 2013..;

 

https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2013/12/why-comcast-and-other-cable-isps-arent-sellin...



I am not a Comcast Employee.
I am a Customer Expert volunteering my time to help other customers here in the Forums.
We ask that you post publicly so people with similar questions may benefit from the conversation.
Was your question answered? Mark the post as Best Answer!