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Understanding MoCA

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Regular Visitor

Understanding MoCA

I've been going in circles with Motorola's support regarding the MM1000 MoCA Adapter I ordered. It's unclear whether it's going to work with my house's configuration, and so I'm unsure if it's worth the risk of ordering a second one. 

 

1) Point of entry of Comcast cable into house is unclear. Numerous Comcast techs over the years have been mystified as to where it is. Luckily it all works anyway, as long as I don't need wired internet downstairs.

 

2) Oops, pandemic happened, and my wife needs wired internet connection downstairs because she can't share the office with me due to confidentiality requirements.  So I'm told I need two MoCA adapters. The first upstairs coax > MoCA > modem router. But I don't understand how that will affect the cable downstairs. Unless it works that the MoCA then sends the assigned IP address internet signal back into coax, and throughout the house network?

3) Coax downstairs currently going into DVR. So I'll need to plug it into second MoCA, then to DVR, and then I can run the ethernet connection directly to the laptop downstairs, fingers crossed that the coax network is all connected. But it all must be, because it's all the same Comcast service, stemming from one single coax cable coming into some mysterious point of entry. I'm told that's the only way to get internet down there. Though technically if I had to I could simply put the modem/router down there.

Thanks for your help.

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Frequent Visitor

Re: Understanding MoCA

I think you answered yourself: you could just move the modem/router to the basement and would be fine, if I understand you right. So why going for a more complex solution? (other than for the technical fun 😉 )

 

If this is really one physical, single coax cable then yes, the MoCA would work as well. If there is anywhere a splitter - typically where the cable enters the house - then it depends: it seems standard practise to use splitters which filter out frequencies above 1GHz. That would affect MoCA. Not sure it was common to use these splitters when your cable was installed ... .

And yes, MoCA is adding an extra signal on your cable. It's in a different frequency range than what Comcast uses, so both signals - your cable internet/TV and MoCA's Ethernet - can co-exist on the same medium.

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Expert

Re: Understanding MoCA


@mbind wrote:

I it seems standard practise to use splitters which filter out frequencies above 1GHz. That would affect MoCA. Not sure it was common to use these splitters when your cable was installed ... 


Yes. It was S.O.P.

 

@Fastnbulbous 

 

If you go the MoCA route, this / these are the type of splitters that will be needed;

 

http://www.amazon.com/Holland-Electronics-GHS-2Pro-M-Splitter-5-1675Mhz/dp/B00P6VHLP0?tag=ds0233-20   




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