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Xfinity refused to return Non-Activated iPhone12 and exchange for iPhone Pro.

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Regular Visitor

Xfinity refused to return Non-Activated iPhone12 and exchange for iPhone Pro.

My wife bought iPhone12 from a local Xfinity store. They didn't have it so they ordered it. She received it a week later from FedEx, didn't want it and had not activated it.  She went back to the store to request return and exchange for an Iphone Pro, but they refused it saying it's an online process, even they're the ones who did the order for her. So I phone contacted and also chatted online, Xfinity requested to have it activated first. The problem is if she activates it her current T-Mobile service would be disconnected and she'll be out of service for another week until Xfinity ships the new Iphone Pro to her. I asked them to just simply issue a FedEx Return label since it's still in unwrapped package which they just flatly refused.  I wonder how much that'll cost if she had activated a brand new phone that she won't use and probably has to pay some restocking fees on top of all that.

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Expert

Re: Xfinity refused to return Non-Activated iPhone12 and exchange for iPhone Pro.

The return policy and restocking fee are covered in the My Xfinity Mobile Customer Agreement.

https://www.xfinity.com/mobile/policies/customer-agreement 

https://www.xfinity.com/mobile/support/article/returns-and-exchanges 


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Regular Visitor

Re: Xfinity refused to return Non-Activated iPhone12 and exchange for iPhone Pro.

The links you provided had good amount of info.  We don't mind the $35 restocking charge but Xfinity required to activate before return. The problem is in this fine print "When you return a device after it's been activated, it will automatically cancel the line associated with that device. This means the number will be lost." She'd lose the number she had for years. So the best way is to find a way to return without activation.  The option "Exchange or Return" or "Return Label" currently is not there, I guess, since the phone is not yet activated. We're in a Catch-22 with Xfinity. They also stated "If you want to exchange your device, you must visit an Xfinity Store or contact us via chat." But chat with them yesterday to request FedEx return label did not lead anywhere, they required activation "per policy". Unless we can find a local store with an available Iphone Pro to do the exchange, but then who knows the store people will throw in some more roadblock. We are at wits end with Xfinity, their return exchange policy for "not opened  unwrapped Iphone" is not customer friendly at all, they just wanted to charge more fees or trap us in their ecosystem. They should have a Costco friendly return exchange policy for unopened product.

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Expert

Re: Xfinity refused to return Non-Activated iPhone12 and exchange for iPhone Pro.

Could she activate the phone with a new number? That way she can port her regular number into another phone.


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I am a Customer Expert volunteering my time to help other customers here in the Forums.
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Re: Xfinity refused to return Non-Activated iPhone12 and exchange for iPhone Pro.

I had passed your suggestion on. One more worry one of her friends who had returned a phone had to pay a 10% depreciation on top of the $35 restocking fee. Looks like it's no longer a simple return exchange of an unopened Iphone 12 , with Xfinity requiring activation, namely using it first. Years ago I bought a Nexus from Google and was having a few problems with it, Google just mailed me another new one no question asked. That's quite different from the way Xfinity handled return exchange.