tlc1196's profile

New Poster

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6 Messages

Sat, Jan 2, 2021 8:00 AM

conductivity

I recently upgrade to 300 MBPS from 100 MBPS.  Before switching I ran the Xfinity speed check using an iPhone and a directly connected desk top.  Out of 5 tests I measured an average of 62.9/5.82.  After the switch I measured 74.3/10.1 which is an increase but no where near 3X.  My desk top measure a download speed around 96 MBPS, before and after the switch, which makes sense but still is no where near 300 MBPS.

 

I m using a MB7420 modem which I bought and a DLINK router DIR 842.

It seems as if we have reached a thershold which can't be exceeded.  My wireless playstation at times will drop me off of share play  and when tested shows poor internet connection.  The console sits about 8 feet away from the modem in the same room.

 

Does this seem normal? thanks.

Responses

CCAndrew

Diamond Problem Solver

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25.9K Messages

5 m ago

It’s normal if your computer isn’t able to go over 100. You would need a at least a gigabit network card for it

New Poster

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6 Messages

5 m ago

Thank you for the feedback.  The desk top is relatively old and I have no idea what Nework card is installed.  That could explain the 96 MBPS speed to the desk top.

 

By what you are telling me it wouldn't matter if I bought any higher of speed it is going to stay the same.  Althugh the Modem does say 16X4 686MBPS, the speed is actually being limited by the Desk top nework card?  How is that possible if I am using an iPhone to test the speed?  I admit my understanding isnt great, but I don't need the computer to connect to the Internet so I am not sure how a network card would effect the speed to other devices.

 

Comast>Modem>Router>devices>Computer>Network>Ring, Printer, 

                                                                 >Wifi>iPhone/playstation/Televisions

 

That's how i understand it works.  If I do need a 1 gig network card it is the one in the desk top?

 

Thanks again

strega7

Regular Contributor

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393 Messages

5 m ago

If an ethernet-connected device is lacking a gigabit ethernet adapter or a cable rated for gigabit speed, then just under 100Mbps is what you'll get.  Wi-Fi is highly variable and depends on your environment, band, and channel, among other things.  I would solve the ethernet issue first, so you can see what you are actually getting, then I would worry about what fraction of that you are able to get over wi-fi. (This is not to say that the PC is a limiter of other devices – it would just be nice to see what your actual speed is.)

 

As a general rule, if speed tests don't hit your maximum speeds at whatever tier you are currently at, I wouldn't really expect going to the next tier to change much.  (ie: you were probably already limited by something other than your speed tier such as congestion, noise, equipment…)  Your results seem to be in-line with that.  You were fine on the upload so the next tier boosted that. 

 

In your case it sounds like it was/is just your Wi-Fi that is having issues, but you can't be sure until you make sure the PC is actually enabled to get such high speeds.

 

By the way, just as another data point, when I started Zooming and Skyping early this year, I was doing it on a laptop (since only my laptops had cameras and mics) but I would frequently get glitches or get totally kicked off calls.  I was calling from my home office, where the router is.   It turns out that when I moved into other rooms, farther from the router, I lost my video calls much less often.  However, the way that I finally got 100% reliable video calls was to get a ~$15 USB to ethernet adapter and plug my laptop in.  Just pointing out that in the room with the Wi-Fi router is sometimes not such a great place for the Wi-Fi.  (And wired is better than Wi-Fi anywhere in my home.)

New Poster

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6 Messages

5 m ago

Really good info, thanks.  In another post I was directed to a chart that says that 11 upload is what I should expect with Blast at 300 MBPS, as I think you agree.  

 

That tells me that the upload is as good as it is going to get at 300.  

It seems to me that all the cables up and down are the same.  I can try some different LAN cables connecting the modem to the router and then the router to the desk top but I do believe the ones I have are all the same.

 

I really don't have a lot of problems with the internet the way it is.  Once in awhile the TV will freeze or we get the spinning arrow.  But I would like to test the speed and get something close to what I thought I bought.

CCAndrew

Diamond Problem Solver

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25.9K Messages

5 m ago

Sorry you didn’t mention using a phone just an old computer and a PlayStation, neither are good testers for speed. To get an accurate account of speed, use a pc with a gig card connected right to the modem. If your pc can’t go over 100 you’ll never see anything different than what you presently see

New Poster

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6 Messages

5 m ago

Thanks again, I tried a lap top connected with a cable and that was really weird.  So now it is simple, all I need is a PC with a 1 gig card in it, simple.  thanks.

New Poster

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6 Messages

5 m ago

I am not sure why i would need a 1GBPS card when at best I will be getting .3GBPS.  The modem is rated for 686 MBPS.  I can only assume that a 6s iPhone can handle over 100 MBPS.  Maybe the desk top has a 100 MBPS limit but I don't think it is that old.

strega7

Regular Contributor

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393 Messages

5 m ago

Common ethernet standards are 10Mb/s, 100Mb/s (fast ethernet),  and 1Gb/sec (gigabit ethernet).  I don’t think you will find 300Mb/s cards, though I suppose a poor performing 1Gb/s card might actually run at 300Mb/s.

BruceW

Gold Problem Solver

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22.4K Messages

5 m ago


@tlc1196 wrote: ... The modem is rated for 686 MBPS. ...

Note that https://www.xfinity.com/support/devices rates the MB7420 for a "Wired Download Speed Up to 374 Mbps", not 686.

 

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