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My computer was hacked. How safe is my wifi router?

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My computer was hacked. How safe is my wifi router?

I unknowingly granted remote access to a hacker on my PC.  I have already been in contact with dredit monitors, banks, etc. What precautions should I take going forward for my home Wifi security?

Expert

Re: My computer was hacked. How safe is my wifi router?


ZekeTheGardener wrote:

I unknowingly granted remote access to a hacker on my PC.  I have already been in contact with dredit monitors, banks, etc. What precautions should I take going forward for my home Wifi security?


Change your wifi password(s)?

Problem Solver

Re: My computer was hacked. How safe is my wifi router?

As a general rule, the following should be observed:

 

1. Update your devices and software regularly - including your router. Security updates are vital to keep your network secure. It only takes one compromised device to allow unauthorized access into your network. If your device has automatic updating capability, turn it on.And as a corollary, always update your software from the program itself, or on the offical site, not from some random popup telling you to update Adobe Flash RITE NAO. And speaking of which....

2. Do not click or reply to unsolicited popups, emails, messages, or other obvious bait for you to reveal your personal information or run potentially malicious software in your sytem. These things rely on misinformation and fear tactics to scare people into falling for their scams.If they purport to be from an official source like the IRS, Microsoft, or similar agency, don't fall for it, verify their claims independently. 

3. Always use different, secure and strong passwords for all your login credentials. If you use "Monkey123", "123456", or "password" as your password for all your logins, you might as well hang up a sign that says "Hackers Welcome" on your router. I suggest you use a password manager such as LastPass, Dashlane or 1Password to manage your passwords, since it can be near impossible to remember many long, complex passwords. 

4. If your account allows the use of Two Factor Authentication. enable it. This ensures that even if someone gets your password, they'd still have to get authorization from you via a different device, such as your smartphone. 

5. Don't ever trust any security software, such as antivirus or antimalware, to protect you. The best security system in the world will be worthless if you casually enter your username and password onto a phishing site, or grant "tech support" remote accesss into youir computer.

 

YOU are your own best security. 

 


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