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Does anyone in tech support know what a Puma 6 chipset is

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Does anyone in tech support know what a Puma 6 chipset is

I purchased an Arris SB6190 cable modem which utilizes an Intel Puma 6 chipset earlier this year.  I periodically use my modem to connect to a workplace VPN and occasionally experience a drop in that connection.  When I called the outsourced tech support no one there could tell me that they were familiar with that chipset and blatantly refused to escalate me to someone who did.  They said I must rent a Comcast Gateway to solve my problem, which I refuse to do.  I am not xenophobic, but I don't want to waste my time with people who are only trained to follow scripts.

 

I want to know if Comcast has issued a firmware update to address the latency issue that the chipset has.  I have corresponded with the manufacturer and they say, "it's not our problem".

 

My only other option is buy a new cable modem, not an Arris that I have been purchasing for almost 20 years, and keep the 6190 as a backup.  I will never purchase an Arris anything again.

Expert

Re: Does anyone in tech support know what a Puma 6 chipset is

As far as I was made aware there is currently no firmware from Arris that fixes the problem

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Expert

Re: Does anyone in tech support know what a Puma 6 chipset is

The Puma 6 is an Intel manufactured chipset used in DOCSIS 3.0 cable modems. It because infamous because of its vulnerability to DDoS attacks and extremely high jitter and lag when subjected to stressful conditions like gaming, video streaming and teleconferencing. The chipset architecture is defective from the get go - as pointed out earlier, no amount of firmware fixes will solve this. 

 

Several modem manufacturers, not just ARRIS, have put out modems with this chipset. If you're shopping for a new modem, avoid anything that's DOCSIS 3.0 that has 32 downstream and 8 upstream channels. Check out https://mydeviceinfo.xfinity.com for approved modems. 

 

Personally I find it ironic that Comcast tech support would tell you to lease a Comcast gateway to solve the problem, when two of their popular XB3 gateways - the ARRIS TG1682G and the Cisco DPC3941T - also have the Puma 6.  

 


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New Poster

Re: Does anyone in tech support know what a Puma 6 chipset is

It makes me regret not doing enough research.  Earlier this year I took the cognitive shortcut of saying that the Arris brand is a safe choice because I have been purchasing it for almost 20 years.  One bad modem can ruin your whole business.  I understand there is litigation about this.  Arris's response is typical of a Harvard MBA, "oh, we're not responsible".  I guess there are no ethics in business when you're only worried about your next quarter.

New Poster

Re: Does anyone in tech support know what a Puma 6 chipset is

The SB6190 is on their recommended equipment list, at least for me.  But, Comcast


@darkangelic wrote:

The Puma 6 is an Intel manufactured chipset used in DOCSIS 3.0 cable modems. It because infamous because of its vulnerability to DDoS attacks and extremely high jitter and lag when subjected to stressful conditions like gaming, video streaming and teleconferencing. The chipset architecture is defective from the get go - as pointed out earlier, no amount of firmware fixes will solve this. 

 

Several modem manufacturers, not just ARRIS, have put out modems with this chipset. If you're shopping for a new modem, avoid anything that's DOCSIS 3.0 that has 32 downstream and 8 upstream channels. Check out https://mydeviceinfo.xfinity.com for approved modems. 

 

Personally I find it ironic that Comcast tech support would tell you to lease a Comcast gateway to solve the problem, when two of their popular XB3 gateways - the ARRIS TG1682G and the Cisco DPC3941T - also have the Puma 6.  

 



didn't make it.  I think the litigation is between Arris and Intel.  I am not going to ever lease a modem unless Comcast mandates it like some other cable providers do.  I really don't like to share my Internet, even if they tell me it won't affect me.

Contributor

Re: Does anyone in tech support know what a Puma 6 chipset is

According to users on DSLReports the SB6190 runs a lot more hotter than a Netgear CM700.

Intel Puma 6 was flawed out of the gate and no amount of firmware will fix this.

If I was you and you needed a 32x8 modem I would get a Netgear CM1000 or the Arris SB68200. They use Broadcom.

However I never got any lag spikes or drops with the Netgear CM700, but the CM700 isnt any better as well.
New Poster

Re: Does anyone in tech support know what a Puma 6 chipset is


@strykerzr350 wrote:
According to users on DSLReports the SB6190 runs a lot more hotter than a Netgear CM700.

Intel Puma 6 was flawed out of the gate and no amount of firmware will fix this.

If I was you and you needed a 32x8 modem I would get a Netgear CM1000 or the Arris SB68200. They use Broadcom.

However I never got any lag spikes or drops with the Netgear CM700, but the CM700 isnt any better as well.

Even though I have purchased nothing but Arris for almost 20 years, I am not going to reward them by purchasing from them again, I don't care how cheap their products are.  They ruined their brand with this chipset.  It was their decision to use it and they are privately blaming Intel for it; I thought I heard about litigation between the two.  Arris is not being responsible for their failure.  Granted, I didn't do enough research, because I took that cognitive shortcut with the brand, but I can't in good conscience continue our relationship, even if it has been almost 20 years.  George Bush, a distant relative of mine, said it, well almost, "Fool me once, shame on you, fool me twice, shame on me".