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Activating ALL CAT5 outlets in home with Comcast cable modem

Frequent Visitor

Activating ALL CAT5 outlets in home with Comcast cable modem

Hello,

   My new home is CAT5 pre-wired. All CAT5 outlets end in a Linksys Ethernet Switch. When I connect the Comcast cable modem to this switch, only one CAT5 outlet is active - it makes sense since the modem has only one IP address. I have a Linksys wireless router on this active CAT5 outlet.

 

 How do I make all CAT5 outlets (or some chosen ones) active?

 

I have been told the following:

 

 Connect the ethernet port on the Comcast cablebox to a router and the router to the switchboard.

 

My questions are:

    1. Should I use a NON-wireless router since I still want wireless in the home (a wireless router in a basement closet will not be very effective)?

    2. Will a CAT5 cable from the router to the 24-port switchboard be enough? If not, do I need to pull out the specific ports I want active (from the 24-port switch) and plug them directly into the router?

 

  

 Thank you in advance for your help - any help will be useful!

 Best,

 Nitin

 

 

Silver Problem Solver

Re: Activating ALL CAT5 outlets in home with Comcast cable modem


nit50mit wrote:

Hello,

   My new home is CAT5 pre-wired. All CAT5 outlets end in a Linksys Ethernet Switch. When I connect the Comcast cable modem to this switch, only one CAT5 outlet is active - it makes sense since the modem has only one IP address. I have a Linksys wireless router on this active CAT5 outlet.

 

 How do I make all CAT5 outlets (or some chosen ones) active?

 

I have been told the following:

 

 Connect the ethernet port on the Comcast cablebox to a router and the router to the switchboard.

 

My questions are:

    1. Should I use a NON-wireless router since I still want wireless in the home (a wireless router in a basement closet will not be very effective)?

    2. Will a CAT5 cable from the router to the 24-port switchboard be enough? If not, do I need to pull out the specific ports I want active (from the 24-port switch) and plug them directly into the router?

 

  

 Thank you in advance for your help - any help will be useful!

 Best,

 Nitin

 

 



You need a router between the cable modem and the switch. I would agree that placing a wireless router in a closet in the basement might not get you the best coverage, but you could try it and see how well it works. You might be surprised, especially if it is a decent router. You could add a wireless access point to one of the ehernet ports elsewhare in the home to extend the wireless network range.

 

If you are asking if the bandwidth of a cat-5 cable will be enough, consider what you are going to be doing. It will also depend on the tier of service you subscribe to from Comcast. If it it true Cat5 cabling (not Cat5e) then you are limited to 100mb/s. If your cable service is less than 100mb/s than generally the bottleneck will be the download speeds you get from Comcasts. If you are going to do a lot of streaming or large file transfers inside your home, then a 100mb/s link between the router and the switch may become saturated, however, you cannot just connect all 4 ports on the router to 4 ports on the switch. you will not quadruple the bandwidth that way, in fact, you will probably cripple your network by causing switching loops. To be able to aggregate the bandwidth betwen the router and the switch, you would need to be able to configure some type of port-channeling, which most consumer routers are just not capable of.

 

If the cabling in your home is Cat5e, and the switch is Gigabit ethernet capable, making sure your router is gigabit capable will increase the size of the pipe between the router and the switch.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

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Problem Solver

Re: Activating ALL CAT5 outlets in home with Comcast cable modem

First off those Cat-5e wires are probably wired just for telephone. You would need to figure out which ones go where, if they are not already labeled. That would mean using a tester. It helps to know how all of the Cat-5e wires are terminated where they all come to as a Demarc point.

As for how many you will be using for wired connections. That can vary. I went from 12 wired jacks to 6. Only a handful of equipment in my home uses wired Ethernet connections.

It does help if you attach a picture of the Ethernet wiring where it all gathers at the end point.

Now for the setup for a Home LAN. You could use a Patch Panel. Or you could do like I did. I used a six port Keystone plate and brought all six drops into a "Smart Box", then attached the RJ-45 Keystones to the end. I used a shelf to place my modem, NAS, router and switch on it. My Access Point that I have uses a POE (Power Over Ethernet) Injector, so that I can place the A/P upstairs in our Living room.

Underneath the shelf for the networking gear. I have a UPS on it. For doing any loopback testing. I use the Ideal Link Master Loop back tester. If you want the step up to check Telephone and Coax. You would need to get the Ideal VDV Multimedia tester. The later costs a little bit more. But worth it.

Get us a picture of all of the wiring, and how it is connected. Then give us a list of what exactly for equipment you want to use.

My list is the following for my network:

Modem - Arris SB614
Router - Cisco RV320
Switch's - Netgear GS108 8-Port Switch & Trendnet TEG-S50g 5-Port Switch
Access Points - Engenius ECB350, Trendnet TEW-638APB
NAS - Lenovo ix2-4.

The 5 port switch is in the Living room. We use it for the DirecTV HR44/700 DVR & Sony BDP-S590 Blu-Ray.

I found going with a Hybrid network worked out better then having a bunch of wired devices on it. We mainly use laptops, tablets and smartphones in our household. No telephone service, since we have Cellphones.

I found the Engenius ECB-350 gives a better wireless footprint. I used to have a Trendnet TEW-690AP. It could barely get past the outside walls of the house. The Engenius covers at least a 100' radius with the windows and doors closed. If we open the windows & doors. I can pick it up to 300' away from the house.
Problem Solver

Re: Activating ALL CAT5 outlets in home with Comcast cable modem

It is most likely 5e. Most people still call it Cat-5. Even with Cat-5e. You can get up to 10gb on a connection with it.
Silver Problem Solver

Re: Activating ALL CAT5 outlets in home with Comcast cable modem


broe_23 wrote:
It is most likely 5e. Most people still call it Cat-5. Even with Cat-5e. You can get up to 10gb on a connection with it.

Nevertheless, there is a performance difference between Cat5 and Cat5e, which important, and the correct definition should not be assumed. Until the OP tells us whether it's Cat5 or Cat5e, then we don't have all the information,  and cannot make definitive statements.

 

And I don't see your point about getting 10Gb/s on a Cat5e cable. Unless you have a 10Gb/s capable consumer router or switch, it's a pointless statement.

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Frequent Visitor

Re: Activating ALL CAT5 outlets in home with Comcast cable modem

This is fabulous information - thank you. I will post a picture as soon as I get home a little later. Thank you all - in the meantime I will digest this information and perhaps help doing that.

 

I have no idea if it is CAT-5 or CAT-5e (I inherited the whole system when we bought the house). I will post details of the router, th emodem, and the switch. I do not k ow what access points are but it will hopefilly be clear in the picture.

 

Thank you all.

Nitin

Problem Solver

Re: Activating ALL CAT5 outlets in home with Comcast cable modem

An Access Point is exactly that.  It allows you Wireless Access to your network.  When you purchase a router with Wireless Access.   It is three devices.  It is a router, switch and a Wireless Access Point.

Problem Solver

Re: Activating ALL CAT5 outlets in home with Comcast cable modem


kevj wrote:

broe_23 wrote:
It is most likely 5e. Most people still call it Cat-5. Even with Cat-5e. You can get up to 10gb on a connection with it.

Nevertheless, there is a performance difference between Cat5 and Cat5e, which important, and the correct definition should not be assumed. Until the OP tells us whether it's Cat5 or Cat5e, then we don't have all the information,  and cannot make definitive statements.

 

And I don't see your point about getting 10Gb/s on a Cat5e cable. Unless you have a 10Gb/s capable consumer router or switch, it's a pointless statement.


The point is that the wiring would have to be almost 25 years old.  And regardless whether a person has a 10gb/s switch or router.  It is the spec that Cat-5e is rated at.

 

Majority of people call Cat-5e Cat-5.  It is like going to a restaurant and asking for a Soda or Pop.  They are the same thing.  Just depends on the person.

Silver Problem Solver

Re: Activating ALL CAT5 outlets in home with Comcast cable modem


broe_23 wrote:

kevj wrote:

broe_23 wrote:

Majority of people call Cat-5e Cat-5.  They are the same thing.  


They most certainly are NOT the same thing...

 

http://www.cat-5-cable-company.com/faq-cat5-v-cat5e.htm

 

I don't care how much networking experience you claim to have..your true colors show when you make false statements like that.

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Moved:

Re: Activating ALL CAT5 outlets in home with Comcast cable modem

Frequent Visitor

Re: Activating ALL CAT5 outlets in home with Comcast cable modem

Hello again,

    Here are some of the details about my CAT5 panel:

 

 Cable Modem (Comcast) : ARRIS Model TM402P/110

  Switch: Linksys 24 pin 10/100 Ethernet switch 

  The cables from the switch go into CAT5 enhanced boards

 

  The wireless router is Linksys Wireless G WRT54GL.

 

  Hence the current configuration is (I have a picture that I do not know how to attach - I do not see any options):

 

External source --> Comcast Cablebox --> Ethernet port attached to input port of the Linksys switch --> input each channel to a socket in the CAT-5 Enhanced board.

 

On one of the 12 CAT5 outlets, I have a Linksys 54GL router. We use many devices wirelessly and do not have much problems especially when we are close to the router.

 

I can attach a picture if you tell me the trick!

 

Thank you.

Nitin

PS: I am following the discussion in CAT-5 versus CAT-5e. Please do not snap at each other; both of you provide valuable information for the uninitiated!

Problem Solver

Re: Activating ALL CAT5 outlets in home with Comcast cable modem

I would suggest a modification to that setup.

Instead of going Modem -> Switch-> Router,  change it around to Modem-> Router-> Switch.

 

That router is rather old and wireless on the slow side being 10/100 and 211G. All depends on what you are hanging on it, if all you have are some tablets and old laptops with built in wireless it might be all you can even use.

 

Both the router and switch are 10/100 limiting the shared pipeline of all devices to 100mbps.  Upgrading the router to a 10/100/1000 with 211N or dual band will improve performance of any newer devices that can take advantage of it. The lower 2.4GHz band of wireless is forced to lowest common denominator so if you have wireless A/B/G devices connecting it will fall back to that lower performance even for any wireless N devices.

Official Employee

Re: Activating ALL CAT5 outlets in home with Comcast cable modem

Cable Modem (Comcast) : ARRIS Model TM402P/110
Switch: Linksys 24 pin 10/100 Ethernet switch
The cables from the switch go into CAT5 enhanced boards
_____________________________

Do yourself a favor and upgrade your modem to a docsis 3 device, your current one is considered end of life

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Silver Problem Solver

Re: Activating ALL CAT5 outlets in home with Comcast cable modem


nit50mit wrote:

PS: I am following the discussion in CAT-5 versus CAT-5e. Please do not snap at each other; both of you provide valuable information for the uninitiated!


I am not 'snapping', I am making sure the information that you receive is correct. Cat5 and Cat5e are NOT the same, despite the obviously misguided opinions of some, who do not seem to have the grace to admit when they are wrong. Rather than insulting other board contributors, the appropriate action would be to apologize for posting inaccurate information, and edit or remove the post to remove the fallacies. People that claim 'experience', yet post inaccurate information, but cannot admit their errors hold no credibility for me. Accountability is one of the strongest traits of a true professional. If you don't want to be held accountable for your actions, and cannot respect when you are wrong, then you are not a professional.

 

Sorry for muddying your thread with this. Back to the topic from here out.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

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New Poster

Re: Activating ALL CAT5 outlets in home with Comcast cable modem

Another trait of professionalism is to respect other parties.  It would help us all when defending the point of Cat5 and 5e differences is to tell us their differences.  From the "newbies" looking at this thread, it does appear that you are "snapping" at the poster.

Silver Problem Solver
Moved:

Re: Activating ALL CAT5 outlets in home with Comcast cable modem

Personal commentary that does not contribute to the technical resolution of the thread.

Silver Problem Solver

Re: Activating ALL CAT5 outlets in home with Comcast cable modem


crowdr wrote:

Another trait of professionalism is to respect other parties.  It would help us all when defending the point of Cat5 and 5e differences is to tell us their differences.  From the "newbies" looking at this thread, it does appear that you are "snapping" at the poster.


The differences are documented in the link whiuch I clearly posted.

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Frequent Visitor

Re: Activating ALL CAT5 outlets in home with Comcast cable modem

Hi All,

   Thank you for the information. This gives me a great starting point. Based on what I read, I will do the following:

 

      I will configure my setup as Cable modem --> Router --> Switch.  I will try my old Linksys router to see the results.  Once I have the basic set up working – that is, all CAT5 outlets showing life, I will follow up on all of other advice:

 

  1. Get a wired router for the "basement" and use a wireless router on one of the CAT5 outlets for better internet access throughout the house.
    • Upgrade the wireless router to a 10/100/1000. Any specific models?
  2. Upgrade my modem to Docsis 3.0. My question is – should I ask Comcast to install one or should I order it off Amazon (Seem to range from $20 to $100). 

 I may come back to ask silly questions – but you guys have been GREAT.

I really appreciate the advice and you taking the time to answer my post.

 

Best Regards,

Nitin

Problem Solver

Re: Activating ALL CAT5 outlets in home with Comcast cable modem


nit50mit wrote:

Hi All,

   Thank you for the information. This gives me a great starting point. Based on what I read, I will do the following:

 

      I will configure my setup as Cable modem --> Router --> Switch.  I will try my old Linksys router to see the results.  Once I have the basic set up working – that is, all CAT5 outlets showing life, I will follow up on all of other advice:

 

  1. Get a wired router for the "basement" and use a wireless router on one of the CAT5 outlets for better internet access throughout the house.
    • Upgrade the wireless router to a 10/100/1000. Any specific models?
  2. Upgrade my modem to Docsis 3.0. My question is – should I ask Comcast to install one or should I order it off Amazon (Seem to range from $20 to $100). 

 I may come back to ask silly questions – but you guys have been GREAT.

I really appreciate the advice and you taking the time to answer my post.

 

Best Regards,

Nitin


Okay sort of taking them out of order.

 

If you do not need voice, then any decent DOCSIS 3 modem should work. Several users here have recommended the Zoom. Rental on a modem is $8 a month, if you buy your own just make sure you hang onto proof of purchase and monitor to make sure not getting charged for rental.

 

You only want one router in the mix it should connect directly to modem as it is your "traffic cop" . You can buy a less expensive older wireless router for use upstairs and just configure it to run as an access point by shutting down it's router function.

Wired router needs to be 10/100/1000, a  connection is only as fast as the slowest segment along it's path anything run through the switch (10/100) will be restricted.

Can either run another line or just bypass switch for connection to wireless AP.

 

Thing to keep in mind for your wireless setup is what exactly do you need to make your devices work? If all you are connecting are a few tablets and old laptops with built in wireless these are probably N150 at best. They only operate in the lower 2.4GHz band so a dual band router doesn't do a lot for you. A good quality dual band 300/600 with external antennae might provide a better signal and filters but it is not going to increase data rate for older devices.

Ideally once you have everything settled down all your hardwired connections will be on the gigabit pipeline, but that can happen as time and funding allow.

As part of my own home setup I needed to extend range for the other end of house for guestroom access. Got a bargain bin netgear dual band N600 router for less than the cost of a 4 port hub, it was a spiffy unit other than the fact that it was a 10/100 connection. As it only had to support older tablets or netbooks this was fine. Backbone is gigabit so can always upgrade later if there is a need.

Official Employee

Re: Activating ALL CAT5 outlets in home with Comcast cable modem

Adding to jemring, if you do have phone service, check if your market allows customer owned Emta ( modems with phone) before you buy and as always when buying modems online " buyer beware".

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Frequent Visitor

Re: Activating ALL CAT5 outlets in home with Comcast cable modem

Quick update:

   I got a Docsis 3.0 Arris TG862 modem from Comcast yesterday. It doubles as a wireless router with 4 ethernet ports. When I connected this to my Linksys Switch, all CAT5 outlets in the house were live. Hence, first mission accomplished.

 

 Now - this modem is in a closet. Wireless on the same floor as this router workes fine; the upstairs is essentially down to "one bar" if at all. The aforementioned WG54 wireless router is still on a CAT5 outlet in the main house (and the outlet is active), but this wireless connection has no internet access.

 

So the next question is: With all of the CAT5 outlets active and a wireless Comcast cable modem / router, how do I:

  1. Disable the wireless part of the Comcast router and activate my Linksys WG54 router? OR

  2. Enable internet access in say the 2nd floor with the Linksys router by using another active CAT5 outlet. Essentially this option expands the wireless signal in the house.

 

  My apologies for these basic questions - but you guys have been tremendously helpful.

 

Thank you,

Nitin

Silver Problem Solver

Re: Activating ALL CAT5 outlets in home with Comcast cable modem

You can use both wireless routers, with the additional older device configured as an Access Pont rather than as a gateway or router. You will be limited to Wireless G from the older router. The other option is to buy a newer router. If you opt for that, you have other routes you could follow.

 

The Comcast gateways have a reputation of having rather poor wirelss perfomance with very limited range. You may find that a newer router that you purchase yourself will perform much better, and provide good coverage for your entire home. If you decide to go with a newer router, you might be able to contact Comcast, and have them place your Arris in full bridge mode, then connect the new router to it, and your switch to the new router. Essentially the same cabling you have now, except the ports in the new router will replace the ports in the Arris. You would have one ethernet cable from LAN port 1 on the Arris going to the Internet port on your new router, and a cable going from one of the LAN ports on the new router to the switch distributing the ethernet signals around your home.

 

The other option is to use the Arris as you currently have it, and use your other router (old or new) as an access point by looking at this article:

 

http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/wireless/wireless-basics/30338-how-to-convert-a-wireless-router-into-...

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Frequent Visitor

Re: Activating ALL CAT5 outlets in home with Comcast cable modem

Thank you kevj. Your response was very clear.

 

Now that I am learning enough to be dangerous, a couple of notes:

1. In reading about the Arris TG682, I read that I can stop the wireless part of this modem by accessing 10.0.0.1 after disconnecting the Comcast cable. In any case, I can always call them (average time on the phone: 45 minutes).

2. Now - I believe that the "bridged" modem will keep all of my CAT5 outlets live; which means that I can hand my WRT54g off of an outlet to get wireless all over the house. That is: Arris Modem --> Switch --> Cat5 outlet --> Linksys wireless router.

   Or do you still recommend Arris --> Linksys Router --> Switch --> Cat5 ?? Of ocurse, I hear you - get a better (perhaps 10/100/1000) router. I will do that.

 

I am excited - to get things working and to learn so much in the process.

Nitin

Silver Problem Solver

Re: Activating ALL CAT5 outlets in home with Comcast cable modem


nit50mit wrote:

Thank you kevj. Your response was very clear.

 

Now that I am learning enough to be dangerous, a couple of notes:

1. In reading about the Arris TG682, I read that I can stop the wireless part of this modem by accessing 10.0.0.1 after disconnecting the Comcast cable. In any case, I can always call them (average time on the phone: 45 minutes).

 

If you  want to use your own router, I would recommend having the Arris gateway placed in Bridge Mode. You can contact Comcast via the Live Chat feature at https://www.comcastsupport.com/chatentry/ to do this. Many people have had better luck that way than via the phone support.

 

2. Now - I believe that the "bridged" modem will keep all of my CAT5 outlets live; which means that I can hand my WRT54g off of an outlet to get wireless all over the house. That is: Arris Modem --> Switch --> Cat5 outlet --> Linksys wireless router.

   Or do you still recommend Arris --> Linksys Router --> Switch --> Cat5 ?? Of ocurse, I hear you - get a better (perhaps 10/100/1000) router. I will do that.

 

If you go direclty from the bridged Arris to your switch that distribtes the ethernet through your home, only one device will work. The router between the modem and the switch creates an internal network of private IP addresses, which allows all of the devices in your home to connect to a local network, and share the single public IP that you are given by Comcast. This public IP will be assigned to the Internet or WAN interface of your router. Take a look at the diagram in this post to see a simple depiction of how this works.

 

http://forums.comcast.com/t5/Home-Networking-Router-WiFi/Port-Forwarding-Primer/m-p/1662603#M51192

 

 You have to bear in mind that the Arris in gateway mode is a combined modem and router, which is why when you connect a port on the Arris to your switch, all of tour ethernet ports are live. It is the equivalent of having the Arris in Bridge mode, with a seperate router connected to it.

I still recommend Arris (bridged) --> wireless router (new) --> switch to distribute to ethernet ports.

Additionally, you could connect an access point to one of the ethernet ports in your house to widen your coverage area.

 

If you want to get things up and running quickly, try Arris (bridged) --> Your current router --> switch to distribute to ethernet ports. You may be surprised at the coverage the Linksys wireless router will give you, despite it's age.

 

I am excited - to get things working and to learn so much in the process.

Nitin


 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

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Frequent Visitor

Re: Activating ALL CAT5 outlets in home with Comcast cable modem

Thank you all. If I may summarize what I learned through this forum and trying to implement things:

 

1. Comcast customer service is filled with people whose accents are impossible to understand, who take 15 minutes to understand the simplest problems, and then 30 minutes to troubleshoot things before you are cut off.. only to wait another 12-15 minutes to connect to them and restart the whole process. They waste more time in being polite than in solving your problem.

2. I installed a Arris TG862 modem/router and immediately ran into dropped interner internet, sporadic coverage etc. At KEVJ's recommendation, I did manage to get the modem into a Bridge mode to improve things (thanks for the chat line Kevj - took an hour but I had dinner at the same time and could do other things).

3. Going the modem --> my router  --> switch activated all outlets but the location of the router in the closet made the signal weak on the 2nd floor.

4. Going back to my very original configuration: Modem --> Switch --> CAT5 outlet (only one active) --> Old Linksys router is absolutely the most effective way to use every wireless device in the 2 floor 6600 square feet house.

 

I got only one easy option of using the configuration in #3 effectively - use a network extender on the 2nd floor since I am a regular internet user (no VPN, port forwarding etc.). Step 3 plus a network extender seems to be a plausible solution for now.

 

I am willing to try anything that does not involve me wasting untold hours with Comcast.

Thank you all again for your time!

 

Best Regards,

Nitin

 

 

 

Problem Solver

Re: Activating ALL CAT5 outlets in home with Comcast cable modem

Maybe we are being just a bit to complicated and fancy with our explanations.

Lets break your hardware down into 3 chunks

 

#1 Modem: Currently an Arris862 gateway.

By default this is a combination modem/router/wireless router. (works well as a modem, wireless is rather weak)

This can be used in Full Bridge Mode as a basic modem

 

#2 Switch and built in Cat5 wiring: Currently a 10/100 switch and cables leading to several locations in house.

Apparently works fine pipeline is 10/100 restricting max speed to 100mbps.

 

 

#3 Original router  Linksys Wireless G WRT54GL: Worked fine for what user needed might not have had enough range to cover whole house. Wireless G speed limitation.

There should be an option in configuration to disable router function called either Bridged Mode or Access Point. Configured as an Access Point should give good coverage of upper floor.

 

 

Cable comes into home -> #1->#2->#3 

Currently configured as modem to single port to router

 

To activate all ports on the switch (#2) you need to either reset Gateway to default mode as a router, or install a router of your own between modem and switch.

If you reset gateway to default mode you need to reconfigure old router. setting it to Bridged or Access Point mode.

If you leave modem in bridged mode and install your own router same applies for old router.

 

Apparently you are doing just fine with current 10/100 wiring so no need for anything fancy.  You can obtain a decent 10/100 wireless router in single or dual band N300/N600 for around $60 from Amazon.  This should compare in cost with a range extender while offering better signal quality and options.

Remember that a range extender/repeater picks up current signal and echoes it  adding a slight delay  at the same signal strength from different location.A weak signal will still be a weak signal. An access point usually provides a strong signal to cover it's area with filtration to reduce interference.

 

Problem Solver

Re: Activating ALL CAT5 outlets in home with Comcast cable modem

If you want all floors to have Wifi. You would need an Access Point on each floor. All of them would have to have the same SSID, Same Passphrase, and on the Same Channel. To keep them from overlapping. You would have to dial down the power. I would still use the Gateway as the router, but turn off WiFi. Sooner or later, that old Linksys is going to die on you, or start giving you problems with not connecting, or dropping connections.
Silver Problem Solver

Re: Activating ALL CAT5 outlets in home with Comcast cable modem


JEMRING wrote:

Maybe we are being just a bit to complicated and fancy with our explanations.

Lets break your hardware down into 3 chunks

 

#1 Modem: Currently an Arris862 gateway.

By default this is a combination modem/router/wireless router. (works well as a modem, wireless is rather weak)

This can be used in Full Bridge Mode as a basic modem

 

#2 Switch and built in Cat5 wiring: Currently a 10/100 switch and cables leading to several locations in house.

Apparently works fine pipeline is 10/100 restricting max speed to 100mbps.

 

 

#3 Original router  Linksys Wireless G WRT54GL: Worked fine for what user needed might not have had enough range to cover whole house. Wireless G speed limitation.

There should be an option in configuration to disable router function called either Bridged Mode or Access Point. Configured as an Access Point should give good coverage of upper floor.

 

 

Cable comes into home -> #1->#2->#3 

Currently configured as modem to single port to router

 

To activate all ports on the switch (#2) you need to either reset Gateway to default mode as a router, or install a router of your own between modem and switch.

If you reset gateway to default mode you need to reconfigure old router. setting it to Bridged or Access Point mode.

If you leave modem in bridged mode and install your own router same applies for old router.

 

Apparently you are doing just fine with current 10/100 wiring so no need for anything fancy.  You can obtain a decent 10/100 wireless router in single or dual band N300/N600 for around $60 from Amazon.  This should compare in cost with a range extender while offering better signal quality and options.

Remember that a range extender/repeater picks up current signal and echoes it  adding a slight delay  at the same signal strength from different location.A weak signal will still be a weak signal. An access point usually provides a strong signal to cover it's area with filtration to reduce interference.

 


This is all an echo of what Ihave already described. My intention was to keep things as simple as possible. There was no attempt to change any of the existing cabling. rather the intentionwas to allow use of existing equipment to connect to existing cabling to provide best coverage. If the OP wants to buy a new router, my suggestion was to replace the existing Linksys with a newer model with bettter range.

 

Simplistically speaking, the options are:

 

  1. use the Arris gateway as a gateway, feed the home ethernet from one of the LAN ports, and add a WAP if needed in one o the other rooms.
  2. bridge the Arris, add a wireless router between the bridged Arris  and the ethernet, and see if the wireless router provides enough coverage.
  3. If the wirelees router does not provide adequeate coverage, add a WAP to one of the ethernet ports in one of the other rooms.

Why is this over complicated or 'fancy'?

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

I don't work for Comcast...


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Silver Problem Solver

Re: Activating ALL CAT5 outlets in home with Comcast cable modem


broe_23 wrote:

If you want all floors to have Wifi. You would need an Access Point on each floor.
No you don't...wifi is perfectly capable of penetrating from one floor to another in common wood framed buildings. It is not necessary to have an access point on 'each floor'.
All of them would have to have the same SSID, Same Passphrase, and on the Same Channel.
Wrong again...if you are going to use multiple access points using the same SSID and passphrase, you should have them on different channels so that signals fromthe two APs donot interfere with each other.
You would have to dial down the power.
Thereby further reducing the coverage area for each AP. Unnecessary if the APs are correctly configured to use different channels.
I would still use the Gateway as the router, but turn off WiFi.
So this would remove one of the APs that you recommend as necessary for expanded wireless coverage.

 


 

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Frequent Visitor

Re: Activating ALL CAT5 outlets in home with Comcast cable modem

Why could I not do the following?

 

Arris in bridge mode -->  NON Wireless router (e.g., Trendnet Broadband non-wireless router on Amazon) --> Switch --> CAT5 Outlet --> Linksys Wireless router (plus the use of other CAT5 outlets for wired connections).

 

Will the non-wireless router and wireless router together be a problem?

 

Thank you,

Nitin

Silver Problem Solver

Re: Activating ALL CAT5 outlets in home with Comcast cable modem


nit50mit wrote:

Why could I not do the following?

 

Arris in bridge mode -->  NON Wireless router (e.g., Trendnet Broadband non-wireless router on Amazon) --> Switch --> CAT5 Outlet --> Linksys Wireless router (plus the use of other CAT5 outlets for wired connections).

 

Will the non-wireless router and wireless router together be a problem?

 

Thank you,

Nitin



That would work OK, as long as you have the wireless coverage you need, and the Linksys is in Access Point mode, not router mode.

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