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TV

I just wanted to let someone know ever since I got this new x1 box my HD picture looks  horrible.  I don't know who had the great idea of replaceing the old HD boxes whitch had a 10x better picture, but they must be nuts.  And as soon as you want to raise my rates I will be cancelling my service.

Expert

Re: TV


@tim250 wrote:

I just wanted to let someone know ever since I got this new x1 box my HD picture looks  horrible.  I don't know who had the great idea of replaceing the old HD boxes whitch had a 10x better picture, but they must be nuts.  And as soon as you want to raise my rates I will be cancelling my service.


any time you change the device connected to a TV's HDMI port you may need to readjust the TV's settings for that port. what capability does your TV display? (1k? 4k?). what is the output setting of the set top box under the settings menu? what is the model number of the set top box (voice remote "About" and reply with the line STB version)? do you pay for HD service? 



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New Poster

Re: TV

welcome to TSG.

You are most likely seeing the artifacts of video compression and decompression. It would very large amounts of storage to hold 4K video where every part of every frame is in sharp focus and it would take very large amounts of bandwidth to send that level of quality video at a decent refresh rate.

The video has to be compressed in order to be able to be sent to viewers using broadcast TV, cable boxes, consumer satellite systems, high speed Internet connections, or cell phones. The compression is lossy and the compression algorithms attempt to determine which areas can afford to loose more detail than others. The algorithms also look at differences between each frame and try to only send the changed data with less compression. A fast changing scene will be more blurry than a scene with little motion

You may also be seeing some depth of field limitations of the lens systems of different cameras. A far background will be blurry to some degree when the camera is focused on a actor's face.

Expert

Re: TV


@tim250 wrote:

welcome to TSG.

You are most likely seeing the artifacts of video compression and decompression. It would very large amounts of storage to hold 4K video where every part of every frame is in sharp focus and it would take very large amounts of bandwidth to send that level of quality video at a decent refresh rate.

The video has to be compressed in order to be able to be sent to viewers using broadcast TV, cable boxes, consumer satellite systems, high speed Internet connections, or cell phones. The compression is lossy and the compression algorithms attempt to determine which areas can afford to loose more detail than others. The algorithms also look at differences between each frame and try to only send the changed data with less compression. A fast changing scene will be more blurry than a scene with little motion

You may also be seeing some depth of field limitations of the lens systems of different cameras. A far background will be blurry to some degree when the camera is focused on a actor's face.


there is no broadcast TV at 4k (other than experimental testing facilities). the broadcasting netowrks are limited in ATSC to mgeg2 streams while cable systems are able to use mpeg4 and soon mpegG (HEVC). the video is taking less and less streaming bandwidth with no measurable loss in picture details. mpeg2 to 4 halved the bandwidth and mpeg4 to HEVC halved that bandwidth yet again.  what you call compression is simply the process of coding video to digital form.  Much of what you describe is caused by carrying video in 'interlaced 1080i" format which indeed does destroy the whole frames (pictures) of mpeg4 video causing all kinds of issues. Some current TVs make it even worse with '120' refresh rates of 60/second data similarly creating midpoint frames that never existed based on forecasted changes on actual frames. in most cases simply removing all 'enhancements' gives you the best image. remember that a 720p would appear without the 4k TV enlarging the picture as a smallish rectangle in the middle of the 4k screen, the 1080i would appear as a slightly larger image but still less than 1/4 of the actual real display area. blowing up an image by the TV's processor will generate video issues. A pure 4k UHD HD video disc player actually can give you all the detail for a 4k, but that format is nearly dead already. 



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