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Lightning HDMI A/V Adaptor Cable

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Lightning HDMI A/V Adaptor Cable

I’m trying to use my Lightning HDMI Adaptor cable to watch Xfinity from my phone to watch on my TV, but it won’t let me. Is there a setting I need to change to use it, if so how do I get to those setting??
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Re: Lightning HDMI A/V Adaptor Cable


@MuckCity56ACE wrote:
I’m trying to use my Lightning HDMI Adaptor cable to watch Xfinity from my phone to watch on my TV, but it won’t let me. Is there a setting I need to change to use it, if so how do I get to those setting??

the DMA copyright settings prevent that use of TV as a stream to device. a PC is currently the only way to attach the stream from a device other than roku to the TV. a PC with the chrome browser can also cast to the TV with ChromeCast device.



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Re: Lightning HDMI A/V Adaptor Cable


@Rustyben wrote:

the DMA copyright settings prevent that use of TV as a stream to device.


I’d like more education on this, if you can provide it.  I occasionally cast from iPhone to TV using this adapter when I desperately want to watch with better than our SD-only cable quality and can afford to not use the phone for other purposes:

 

1) if this is a copyright violation, why (by and large)  do the TV and cable sports apps allow it?  (E.g., NBC, Fox, ABC, TBS, TNT, NBC Sports, Fox Sports, OWN, several others I’ve tried as long as you supply Comcast acct/passwd).  By denying the same via Xfinity Streaming App, is Comcast implicitly suggesting that these other entities might be in copyright violation?  See NOTE.

 

2) What does DMA stand for?

 

NOTE:  ESPN no longer supports this.  Their WatchESPN app did, but has recently been retired.  The ESPN app does not support casting thru this device other than allowing audio through.

Expert

Re: Lightning HDMI A/V Adaptor Cable


@ForrestS wrote:

@Rustyben wrote:

the DMA copyright settings prevent that use of TV as a stream to device.


I’d like more education on this, if you can provide it.  I occasionally cast from iPhone to TV using this adapter when I desperately want to watch with better than our SD-only cable quality and can afford to not use the phone for other purposes:

 

1) if this is a copyright violation, why (by and large)  do the TV and cable sports apps allow it?  (E.g., NBC, Fox, ABC, TBS, TNT, NBC Sports, Fox Sports, OWN, several others I’ve tried as long as you supply Comcast acct/passwd).  By denying the same via Xfinity Streaming App, is Comcast implicitly suggesting that these other entities might be in copyright violation?  See NOTE.

 

2) What does DMA stand for?

 

NOTE:  ESPN no longer supports this.  Their WatchESPN app did, but has recently been retired.  The ESPN app does not support casting thru this device other than allowing audio through.


2) https://www.britannica.com/topic/digital-rights-management

 

use of xfinity stream app is for mobile devices. in-home includes use of roku devices.  you can use an inexpensive chromebook and stream from it using the TV as a 2nd monitor (a grandfathered use of a TV screen) or stream from a PC using the chrome browser to a chromecast dongle device. (only TVgo channels)



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Re: Lightning HDMI A/V Adaptor Cable

Thanks for the reply, RustyBen. My goal remains, while I am away from home 80% of the time, to sometimes use my iPhone with a good 4G feed to cast HD to a larger monitor using my Xfinity credentials. I haven’t fully explored Chromecast but fear other limitations from what I’ve read.

Anyway I stumbled onto articles about HDCP, a protocol to prevent unauthorized capture-and-copy of HD streams. Apple’s Lightning-to-HDMI adapter is very likely not HDCP-capable. That said, most provider apps don’t care that much. My guess is that ESPN detects the lack of HDCP and cares because of its ESPN+ pay-extra capability, and inhibits casting for everything, not just ESPN+ material.

Yet, the NBC Sports App allows casting, despite offering much-pricier Sports Gold offerings. I’m not a member, maybe that app is smarter and disallows casting of Gold offerings while allowing standard. A guess for sure.

99% of providers currently don’t care if this adapter isn’t HDCP compliant, and have opted to allow their paying customers to cast iPhone streams to monitors.

Finally, for the first time, I see the logic of the Xfinity Streaming app for disallowing casting to monitor through this device. It is the policy decision of each provider to allow casting despite the chance of nerds (pirates) intercepting and copying the HD-streamed materials. (I.e., if one wants to cast, use the provider’s app whereby they reserve the right to prohibit casting however rare this is today.) An educated guess anyway.

Thanks again.