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Devices with Intel Puma 6 chipset

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Expert

Re: Devices with Intel Puma 6 chipset


@OZ_hamster wrote:

That is a rather facile response, as the last survey I saw showed over 200 million gamers in North America, and a decent slice of them are doing real-time interactive multi-player gaming, such as World of Warcraft, Minecraft, etc.  As far as UHD streaming, 4K televisions have plummeted in price,  and streaming devices such as Roku now support high-res video; content providers as well are moving into that realm..  Also, there was a class-action lawsuit filed last year in federal court, charging both Arris and Netgear with selling equipment with known and well-documented flaws.  Of course, Arris and Netgear have not issued recalls of defective devices, depending on the good old caveat emptor fall-back position.  My point is this: whether there are 10 end-users or 10 million affected by bad units, the cable companies are caught in the middle, and continue to list as approved modems/gateways that have the Intel Puma 6 chipset, knowing that their tech support people will be confronted by issues for which there is no cure.  Firmware "upgrades" only compromise the original specs, as reductions in latency and jitter are made at the expense of speed, so, no fix there.

My original question remains: why does Comcast still have on its approval list flawed devices?


Nobody's forcing anyone to buy or lease the Puma6 modems or gateways. I myself won't use one because of the known issues.

 

However, until the courts order the Puma 6 modems pulled, they're going to stay on the shelves, as they're CableLabs tested and certified and they work for a majority of users. 

 

My answer still stands. You can accept it or not. 


Comcast Experts are other customers who volunteer their time helping on the forum and have been recognized by the community. For more information on the Expert Program, please click here.
Unless so specifically stated, my opinions written herein are my own and do not necessarily reflect the views of Comcast, its official employees or affiliates.
Frequent Visitor

Re: Devices with Intel Puma 6 chipset

That is a rather facile response, as the last survey I saw showed over 200 million gamers in North America, and a decent slice of them are doing real-time interactive multi-player gaming, such as World of Warcraft, Minecraft, etc.  As far as UHD streaming, 4K televisions have plummeted in price,  and streaming devices such as Roku now support high-res video; content providers as well are moving into that realm..  Also, there was a class-action lawsuit filed last year in federal court, charging both Arris and Netgear with selling equipment with known and well-documented flaws.  Of course, Arris and Netgear have not issued recalls of defective devices, depending on the good old caveat emptor fall-back position.  My point is this: whether there are 10 end-users or 10 million affected by bad units, the cable companies are caught in the middle, and continue to list as approved modems/gateways that have the Intel Puma 6 chipset, knowing that their tech support people will be confronted by issues for which there is no cure.  Firmware "upgrades" only compromise the original specs, as reductions in latency and jitter are made at the expense of speed, so, no fix there.

My original question remains: why does Comcast still have on its approval list flawed devices?

Expert

Re: Devices with Intel Puma 6 chipset


@OZ_hamster wrote:

Transitioning to retail modem, and as many other Comcast customers have noted, there are several approved modems/gateways that have onboard Puma 6 chipset, well known for several operational flaws, and that no (global) firmware upgrade has fixed, as of this writing.  I wanted the Netgear CM-700 for its gigabit download speed and 32X8 channel-bonding, but returned the device to Amazon because of the aforementioned issues, and have settled on the CM-600 w/ Broadcom chipset.

My question is: why are the compromised devices still on Comcast approval list?


Because while the Puma 6 devices are prone to excessive lag and jitter, these will not affect normal internet browsing, email, social media, and most video streaming, which is what the vast majority of people use their internet connections for. 

 

Obviously those who play online games, use video conferencing, and watch high end video streams should look to other solutions. 

 

Besides, the highest download speed Comcast currently offers on DOCSIS 3.0 is 400 Mbps, and any 24x8 modem like the CM600 is more than capable for that speed tier. 

 

 


Comcast Experts are other customers who volunteer their time helping on the forum and have been recognized by the community. For more information on the Expert Program, please click here.
Unless so specifically stated, my opinions written herein are my own and do not necessarily reflect the views of Comcast, its official employees or affiliates.
Frequent Visitor

Devices with Intel Puma 6 chipset

Transitioning to retail modem, and as many other Comcast customers have noted, there are several approved modems/gateways that have onboard Puma 6 chipset, well known for several operational flaws, and that no (global) firmware upgrade has fixed, as of this writing.  I wanted the Netgear CM-700 for its gigabit download speed and 32X8 channel-bonding, but returned the device to Amazon because of the aforementioned issues, and have settled on the CM-600 w/ Broadcom chipset.

My question is: why are the compromised devices still on Comcast approval list?