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Federal government announcement re: Russian hacking of home and office routers

New Poster

Federal government announcement re: Russian hacking of home and office routers

Today the federal government announced a warning that Russian havkers were focusing efforts on routers, including those being used by state and local government, businesses, other organizations, and homes.  What steps is Comcast taking in response?  What specific steps should homeowners take to protect their routers from intrusion by foreign agents?  How can homeowners detevt whether an intrusion has occurred in the recent past or is currently underway?  

Expert

Re: Federal government announcement re: Russian hacking of home and office routers

For your own router that you own, if you bought your own router alone, you can make sure if your router is on the latest firmware. Modems and Gateways (Modem & Router Combo) get updates automatically pushed to them by Comcast themselves

Expert

Re: Federal government announcement re: Russian hacking of home and office routers

Honestly, unless you're a high value target like a government official, corporate officer, or entertainment celebrity, it's extremely unlikely hackers are going to go after you personally. I suspect much of the hysteria around Russian hacking is just that - hysteria. 

 

What you should do is practice basic computer security:

 

1. Update all your software and hardware regularly, not just your router, but also your laptops, cell phones, browsers, operating systems, Smart TVs, and other internet connected devices like light bulbs and refrigerators.... even your aquarium thermometers. If Autoupdate is possible, enable it.

2. If you're on a Windows or Mac computer, don't use an Administrator account as your primary one. (Linux and UNIX users already know this)

3. Backup all your important files regularly - have at least two local copies if you can, and one remote one, in case of disaster in your home. 

4. Don't use the same password on multiple sites, and use long, complex ones when possible. A password manager like LastPass or 1Password can help you generate and remember secure passwords. And if your logon supports two factor authentication - use it. 

5. Don't frequent questionable sites, don't open attachments in email unless you've verified it with the sender personally, and don't click on popups in browsers. 

6. Only install software or plugins you absolutely need - the more items you install, the more holes you open up  in your system. 

7. As in real life, if something looks too good to be true, it probably is.

8. Do not rely on antivirus or security software to protect you - Norton Security will not protect you if you click on that Flash popup telling you to log into your bank account or else you lose all your money. The best defense is still your common sense. 

9. Stay anonymous. If you *must* be on social media, be careful what you post. Privacy is such a precious thing nowadays. 

10. Check your bank accounts regularly for anomalies, plus some banks offer credit monitoring features for free. 

 

 

 

 


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New Poster

Re: Federal government announcement re: Russian hacking of home and office routers


@darkangelic wrote:

Honestly, unless you're a high value target like a government official, corporate officer, or entertainment celebrity, it's extremely unlikely hackers are going to go after you personally. I suspect much of the hysteria around Russian hacking is just that - hysteria. 

 

 

 


I used to think that way, too but now that's pre-9/11 thinking (not thinking imaginatively enough)?  There's more at stake than just any individual since the more systems that can be taken over the easier it would be for a foreign entity to disrupt the entire system (ie, denial of service, etc.).