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How much streaming HD video do you get for one gigabyte of data

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How much streaming HD video do you get for one gigabyte of data

My 1024 gig per month data goes pretty quick.  I was told one you get about one hour of streaming HD video per gig......The first two months of service I seemed to be getting one hour per gig...now it seems I am using 2 or 3 gigs for only one hour of HD streaming...I have changed my wireless passwords just in case but still seem to be using more than I used to per hour...  just wondering if anyone else has tried to measure their data usage...

Service Expert

Re: How much streaming HD video do you get for one gigabyte of data


rad2 wrote:

My 1024 gig per month data goes pretty quick.  I was told one you get about one hour of streaming HD video per gig......The first two months of service I seemed to be getting one hour per gig...now it seems I am using 2 or 3 gigs for only one hour of HD streaming...I have changed my wireless passwords just in case but still seem to be using more than I used to per hour...  just wondering if anyone else has tried to measure their data usage...


Hi, I moved your post to the streaming website area of the forum.

 

Comcast is converting from mpeg2 to mpeg4 format for non-local channels. Generally, a movie in mpeg2 will take 3-5 GB whereas same movie in mpeg4 will take approximately 1 GB.

 

Comcast has a usage 'meter' and breakdown by device on data used at https://customer.xfinity.com/MyServices/Internet/UsageMeter/ (note that the next feature will not currently work on chrome browser) and you can hit the link under the meter that says "view detailed data usage where it will show by device the data bytes used.




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Re: How much streaming HD video do you get for one gigabyte of data

Rustyben wrote:

Comcast has a usage 'meter' and breakdown by device on data used at https://customer.xfinity.com/MyServices/Internet/UsageMeter/ (note that the next feature will not currently work on chrome browser) and you can hit the link under the meter that says "view detailed data usage where it will show by device the data bytes used.

 

This feature works perfectly fine for me on Chrome browser. It displays the accurate reading of 50 GB used right next to my wireless router. I just checked it on firefox and the page is identical. 

 

However, what it doesn't do is actually "break down" how much data is used, either by what kind of media (__GB on HD video, __ GB on webpages, __ GB on MMS), or, even better, by which actual device that you use with your hands (__ GB used by this personal laptop, __ GB by this phone, this tablet, game console, etc). I wish it did, so you could tell if one person in the household is using up all the data, or if one device is malfunctioning, or running when it shouldn't be. I would imagine, if a person notices that their data usage is unusual, and is even able to put exact numbers to it, as Rad did, they must already have some way to find those numbers, and to see how much data they typically use versus how much they're using now, so they probably don't need a link to see that exact same information. The tool they likely need is to know how they're using that much. Something like one of those two above options, that gives you a way to examine where exactly that data is actually going, would likely be much more helpful. Maybe comcast should look into providing that if they don't already 😉

 

I'm also really stuck on the comment regarding the mpeg formats; if Rad's problem is that he's using more data than he used to, how does it help to inform him that comcast video now uses less data? That seems pretty contradictory in relevance to the problem he's saying he has. And if it's true, then comcast's new lower-data video most likely isn't what's causing unusually high data usage. I don't see how it helps to repeat what he already said about how much data a several-hour movie should take, when you obviously agree, but the problem is that it's not behaving how you both agree that it should. Making that statement neither corrects his expectations (you both agree that about two hours of video should equal about two GB or less), nor does it explain the unexpected data usage he's actually seeing; if the new video format should use less than they did before, why is he instead using MORE than he used to? More to the point, if someone says, "I'm using more data than I think I should be," why respond with "well you should be using even less than you think"? That just highlights the problem as being worse than previously thought. Not only have you not suggested any possible causes for him to try and investigate and take care of, but if the mpeg formats ARE relevant at all, then all you've done is point out that even more data is inexplicably being used than he'd accounted for, without offering any ideas of what that extra missing data might be getting used up by, if the new videos aren't what's using it. The question is, what's using that missing data, and how to find that out. So I'm just confused as to why bring the formats up at all when it doesn't answer that question in any way, only makes it more pronounced.

 

Rad- You said you changed your wireless password already, which is a good step. But since there are other ways to hitchhike on someone's wireless, and especially if you might have changed the wireless password through the comcast site (just in case someone may have been able to peek at that, I don't know for sure how secure their site is, honestly), I would suggest checking out the list of devices connected to your router in your router's admin settings, which you can access offline and completely separate from the comcast site. (Comcast does offer an option on their site to check the individual devices that have logged into xfinitywifi hotspots with your account, but that's not the same as which are connected to your own, at-home network.) Check for any unfamiliar devices, and disconnect anything you don't recognize or don't use anymore. If you suspect someone may have been able to get onto your router, changing the SSID as well as the password can help break any hacked-in connections that use something like a password finder. After "cleaning" your router connections, check your exact current data usage, and then do a test. Watch exactly an hour of standard 1080p HD video, and see how much it pushes your data up. If it still uses much more than you're expecting- and, probably just as a harmless precaution everyone should do regularly anyway- you may want to look over your actively running and startup programs, including anything on your computer with any kind of cloud-syncing or automatic updates, and run a scan/cleaner on your PC to see if you've got any nasty hidden programs chewing into your internet. If none of that gives you an answer at all, I can try and think of other ways to help you troubleshoot; or, I can't guarantee how helpful they'll be, but you can always give comcast tech support a shot! :X 

 

Good luck! Hope you get your data usage back under control.

Service Expert

Re: How much streaming HD video do you get for one gigabyte of data

I use app Fing and update each device with a local name so nothing is connected that I have no record of (unauthorized). Fing is free to use.




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Frequent Visitor

Re: How much streaming HD video do you get for one gigabyte of data


Rustyben wrote:

I use app Fing and update each device with a local name so nothing is connected that I have no record of (unauthorized). Fing is free to use.


Free or not, you can already do that in the built-in router admin settings. And I already told OP to do exactly that in my very last post. 

What does this app offer that you can't do more directly elsewhere? 

Problem Solver

Re: How much streaming HD video do you get for one gigabyte of data

The question the OP is asking to begin with is very vague. Where is the OP streaming these videos from? Only from Comcast, or an outside Internet site? What HD resolution is the OP streaming (720, 1080, 1440, or dare I say 2160/4K)? This too can make a difference in downloaded data size.

 

If only using the Xfinity Stream website (and not watching TVGO channels or content), then the OP shouldn't be seeing any significant rise in data usage, per how the system is suppose to work. Trust me though, the system doesn't always work how Comcast says it should. I had a similar problem over 2 years ago where all my streaming through the Xfinity Stream website and app while in home was counting against my data cap. Took Comcast awhile to figure out they had a bug in their system.

 

Bottom line is the OP should be more detailed in what they are asking.

 

To give a simple example of data received from YouTube, I watched a 3 minute 4K movie trailer, which caused my Internet usage to rise just over 300 Megabytes. Same trailer at 720p, just about 25 Megabytes.

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