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What is an "X1 Amplifier"??

Regular Visitor

What is an "X1 Amplifier"??

Hello,

 

I recently had an X1 HD DVR installed. It is working fine and I am happy with it. After the initial installation, I got a call from Customer Service, saying a tech needed to come back and adjust it because they were detecting that the upstream signal was too high. Well whatever; I said OK and the tech came back. The X1 DVR was being fed through an Extreme Broadband powered amplifier that had been installed by a previous Comcast tech. The second tech told me that the X1 DVR needed to be fed through ANOTHER splitter that would also feed the Extreme Broadband amp. Well,  now I am back to rat's nest of splitters that I have been steadfastedly eliminating over the last year. The tech told me there was an amplifier he referred to as an "X1 Amplifier" that had all the right signal gain and loss factors to match the X1, and I wouldn't have to use this new separate splitter.

 

Google and Search on Comcast.net and comcast.com knows nothing about an X1 Amplifier. Can anyone help? If you can give me the manufacturer and model number, I can go look at the spec sheet and verify that is suited to my setup.

 

Thanks!

Steve - W4EPI

Silver Problem Solver

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??

you cannot google something that is brand new and comcast proprietary.  If you post this in the x1 forum which is in the sticky thread someone from comcast might be able to help you there.

 

all x1 questions need to go there.  Most people do not have x1 its out only in limited release.

Regular Visitor

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??

Funny, there are already plenty of hits in Google on the X1; search engines care less about proprietary aspects. If the crawler finds it, the info gets indexed. If I don't get any useful replies, I will cross post to the X1 Forum.

 

SD

Regular Visitor

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??

To provide a little more detail, the powered amplifier installed by Comcast before the X1 was started up is an Extreme Broadband IPA1008D-VF. The digital splitter added after the X1 was started up is an Extreme Broadband BDS102H, which provides a quantity of 2 -3.5db outputs. Again, here is the setup:

 

Comcast signal feed -> BDS102H -> Output 1 ->X1 HD DVR / Output 2 -> IPA1008D-VF -> Ariss 822 modem + other house drops

 

My objective is to find one powered amp like the IPA1008D that provides the right upstream signal levels from the X1, and eliminate the BDS102H.

 

Thanks for any help offered.

 

Steve - W4EPI

Regular Contributor

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??


W4EPI wrote:

To provide a little more detail, the powered amplifier installed by Comcast before the X1 was started up is an Extreme Broadband IPA1008D-VF. The digital splitter added after the X1 was started up is an Extreme Broadband BDS102H, which provides a quantity of 2 -3.5db outputs. Again, here is the setup:

 

Comcast signal feed -> BDS102H -> Output 1 ->X1 HD DVR / Output 2 -> IPA1008D-VF -> Ariss 822 modem + other house drops

 

My objective is to find one powered amp like the IPA1008D that provides the right upstream signal levels from the X1, and eliminate the BDS102H.

 

Thanks for any help offered.

 

Steve - W4EPI


That splitter amp is supposed to be unity gain through it - essentially making it appear that each drop is directly connected.  So the additional two-way splitter is taking the level to/from your X1 down by 3.5dB - that's not a lot and usually there should be more tolerance or a wide enough window for it to work without that.  So it sounds like your entire setup is probably on the edge of hot.  If that is true, there may not be much else you can do - add an in-line pad instead of the splitter - not sure it is worth it.  If its is working well, I'd leave it alone.

Regular Visitor

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??

Thanks for the feedback. Your comments gave me an idea. If the upstream signal from the X1 is the only one that is too high, maybe what I can do is just move the splitter so that all it does is attenuate the signal from/to just the X1, not the signal from the IPA1008 to/from Comcast. Arrangement would then be:

 

->Comcast Signal Feed -> IPA1008 AMP Output #n -> Digital Splitter Output 1 -> X1 HD DVR / Output 2 -> 50 ohm terminator.

 

I still have a splitter that I don't want, but it at least it is only on one circuit and maybe even hidden. Still, I wonder what the Comcast Tech was talking about when he mentioned an "X1 Amplifier" that handled everything.

 

Steve W4EPI

Regular Contributor

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??


W4EPI wrote:

Thanks for the feedback. Your comments gave me an idea. If the upstream signal from the X1 is the only one that is too high, maybe what I can do is just move the splitter so that all it does is attenuate the signal from/to just the X1, not the signal from the IPA1008 to/from Comcast. Arrangement would then be:

 

->Comcast Signal Feed -> IPA1008 AMP Output #n -> Digital Splitter Output 1 -> X1 HD DVR / Output 2 -> 50 ohm terminator.

 

I still have a splitter that I don't want, but it at least it is only on one circuit and maybe even hidden. Still, I wonder what the Comcast Tech was talking about when he mentioned an "X1 Amplifier" that handled everything.

 

Steve W4EPI


you would want to use 75ohm F terminators for catv applications.

 

the amp he mentioned might be called an "X1  Amp" as slang because it works better with the X1 box but might have some other manufactuer name altogether - who knows what it is.

New Poster

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??

I've been told that our home also needs the x1 amplifier.  Had older technology dvr boxes upgraded to the new x1 boxes on 6/13 and 4 service techs/call later ... no amp b/c tech does not have them.  Today tech never even showed up ... waited 8am-8pm for a tech b/c Comcastho told me I was scheduled for today between these hours  I'm very flustrated and considering leaving Comcast b/c of their lack of Customer Service and care.  They need to pay me my wages for their missed appointments and lack of thoroughness.  The $20 they offer doesn't compensate much after 4 tech appts and each saying the same thing.  Still waiting on x1 amplifier from Comcast!!!

Regular Contributor

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??

You want either the active return ppc evo 1-5-u/u or the active return ppc evo 1-9-u/u, I believe the only difference is the number of outlets. One has 5 and one has 9
Contributor

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??

Exactly what cldlhd said.

 

You need one of those amps likely.

 

http://www.evolutionbb.com/cable/assets/files/spec_sheets/EvolutionEntrySeries_2.pdf

 

 

That shows you a picture of what it looks like.

Regular Contributor

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??


joderme wrote:

Exactly what cldlhd said.

 

You need one of those amps likely.

 

http://www.evolutionbb.com/cable/assets/files/spec_sheets/EvolutionEntrySeries_2.pdf

 

 

That shows you a picture of what it looks like.




The one I ordered is the same except it's blue and says active return on it . Only technical difference I can see is the one you attached the link to has -10.5 db on the return while the active return has 0 losses in both directions-thanks for the kudos

Regular Contributor
Regular Contributor

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??

Official Employee

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??

Why did you pay for one when Comcast techs have them and don't charge when you need it?
Helpful hint when you hook it up, the port next to the input is for modems only, if you have a hub or terminal on it, it won't communicate with the rest
Official Employee

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??

If you do order one order the one like cld posted the red one jacks up the signals return, the blue one is passive with no loss/gain
Regular Contributor

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??


andrew.lindsay wrote:
If you do order one order the one like cld posted the red one jacks up the signals return, the blue one is passive with no loss/gain

I got one cheap on ebay-$22 total including s&h- Well the first comcast tech who installed my main hub sept 29th said the splitter setup in my attic was fine for the one x1 box and two DTA's I had but if I upgraded to x1 mini boxes I should get the lossless splitter/amp based on my signal.He used an unbalanced 3 way splitter with the bias towards the x1 box, had the other 2 with 1 going to my modem with the remaining one going to a 2 way splitter that went to my remaining 2 tv's with dta's-phew! I got the 2 dta's replaced with X1 anyroom boxes last week (Nov 21st) and the tech-different one -said my signal was "good enough" and I didn't need it. Bedroom box is pretty slow sometimes -realize it'll be slower than the main box but not that slow- so figure  it might help,talked to a tech on the street and he said it might hurt so I figure it'll be easier to just get my own and check it out.

Official Employee

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??

Cool, just keep hub and terminal on the right side of the amp and you should be fine,
Regular Contributor

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??

I assume looking at the picture working left to right would be comcast feed, modem, power in from adapter and my 3 tv drops could go in any one of the 4 to the right marked output

http://i.ebayimg.com/t/9-PORT-PPC-EVOLUTION-AMPLIFIER-SIGNAL-BOOSTER-CABLE-AMP-P-N-EVO1-9-U-U-CATV-/...

Regular Contributor

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??

Official Employee

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??

correct, also if you need to remote power it dont put the splitter for it behind the hub or terminals it can stop the boxes from communicating

Regular Contributor

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??

thanks for the help but little confused by what you mean by remote power it .I wired an electrical  outlet in the attic near where all my cable lines come together and I'm going to plug the adapter into the outlet then run the coax that threads onto it over to the amp and connect it to the 3rd port from the left I noticed the 4th port in labeled output with rf+dc under it is an output for a tv just like the 3 to its right?

Official Employee

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??

That fourth port is for times when the amp for whatever reason can't be close to power.There's a splitter that should come with it that lets you remote power through a live coax outlet.

Regular Contributor

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??

oh ok, was just checking out ppcs website and saw that hookup with the splitter but with an outlet nearby ill just power it that way. Ill hook my 3 tv's to the 3 ports on the right but if I add a fourth tv it looks like I can connect i to that fourth port 

Gold Problem Solver

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??

Last night I installed a PPC EVO1-5 u/u splitter amp. It is mentioned earlier in this thread. It is a 5-way splitter amp with active (amplified) return signal path. In theory it has 0db forward gain and 0db reverse gain so essentially what it is doing is replacing the forward and reverse losses caused by running signal through the splitter. The signal levels on my X1/X2 DVR look great and appear to be with spec (whatever that is). The signal levels on my two Companions look a bit hot but everything seems to be working just fine.

 

I intend to keep track of signal levels and do a more thorough report at some point but at first glance I think the amp is working properly with no negative drawbacks or side effects. If this product has been designated as the "Amp for X1/X2" I can see why. At least in my case it seems to be doing exactly what the X1/X2 needs.

 

Rick G. in MSP

Regular Contributor

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??

I removed mine as I was getting over 18 dbmv on my companion boxes and 14 dbmv on my main hub. I'm using a 2 way and a a 3 way unbalanced splitter. I have the input line to the 2 way ,the internet modem running off the one -3.5 leg with the other -3.5 feeding the 3 way with the moca filter between them . The x1 main hub is coming off the - 3.5 and the 2 companions off the -7 legs.

Gold Problem Solver

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??

cldlhd,

 

I am not gonna get too excited about the "numbers" until we get a clear explanation of what signal levels are considered in spec or out of spec. My system seems to be working as well or better than it ever has. The new amp didn't fix anything (I am still getting the momentary audio dropouts) but it hasn't made anything worse either.

 

If my guess about the boxes displaying out of spec readings in RED is correct, my X1/X2 DVR's signal levels are all within spec but my Companions are still a bit hot. As we discussed the other day, I am struggling to understand what could be wrong with a higher SNR number. It appears that an SNR reading above 38.0 changes the reading to RED.

 


cldlhd wrote:

I removed mine as I was getting over 18 dbmv on my companion boxes and 14 dbmv on my main hub. I'm using a 2 way and a a 3 way unbalanced splitter. I have the input line to the 2 way ,the internet modem running off the one -3.5 leg with the other -3.5 feeding the 3 way with the moca filter between them . The x1 main hub is coming off the - 3.5 and the 2 companions off the -7 legs.




Regular Contributor

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??

Ya my snr actually went once I took the amp out, my main box went up to 37 from 36 and my companion boxes are at 41.9. I originally had everything through a 4 way splitter but the internet was slow until I did a refresh . It was good for a week (57 mbps down) but once I disconnected the modem then reconnected my speeds dropped down to 1- 2 down and stayed there after multipe reboots and signal refreshes from comcast so I figured my modem likes more signal even though it had 8.5 dbmv thru the 4 way

Official Employee

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??

Rick you want between 8 and -8 down and between 35 and 50 up and snr over 35. I'm not sure why the snr in 41 shows up as bad (red)but that's about as high as it goes. Check your PM
Regular Contributor

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??

My x1 boxes were fine it was the internet I had issues with. Using the same 4 way splitter I couldn't get higher than 1-2 mbps download although my upload speeds were the same. I connected the input line directly to the internet line using a female to female coupling and they jumped back to 57 mbps down. Hooked back up to the 4 way and they dropped again even though my downstream power ( 5.5 dbmv ) and snr (36 ) were good, thought maybe the splitter was bad so used another one I had with same result. Thinking maybe my modem likes a little more power for whatever reason so I have input into 2 way , one 3.5 leg going right to modem ,other feeding an unbalanced 3 way with the moca filter between the 2 splitters. All three x1 boxes come off the 3 way with the main hub favored on the 3,5.   now x1 main hub,  +7.4 dbmv ,37 snr

                         2 companion boxes, + 6.4 dbmv , 41.9 snr

                     internet /phone modem , +11.5, 37 snr

 

  It's been good since I hooked it up that way even though the modem is borderline high.By the way I noticed when my speeds were slow the first 3 downstream channels on the modem were good but the 4th wouldn't connect.

Gold Problem Solver

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??

I have been using the PPC EVO1-5 u/u since last Monday and it seems to have improved my signal levels especially incoming. I am now seeing upstream numbers around 38-39, Downstream numbers are around +1 to +2 and the SNR numbers are 38-41. Everything has worked great (except for the ongoing known issues) since I installed this amp.

 

Yesterday morning I stopped at a clients house who just had a new install done by Comcast and I noticed the tech installed a PPC EVO1 u/u so maybe this particular amp/splitter is in fact the "X1 Amplifier"...

 

Thanks Andrew for posting the "target signal levels".

 

Rick G. from MSP

 

 

Official Employee

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??

I don't know what an Evo 1 is. There should be another number after it. There's another evo1-9-u/u that is used and it has more ports. The number after it is the number of ports available. Bothe the Evo 1-5 and 1-9 are used because you aren't adding forward and return levels, the only loss is over distance
Gold Problem Solver

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??

PPC EVO1-5 u/u,

 

The loss over distance along with replacing the loss of passing the signal through the 5-way splitter. Without some sort of amplification, a 5-way splitter would be down about 10db per tap.

 


andrew.lindsay wrote:
I don't know what an Evo 1 is. There should be another number after it. There's another evo1-9-u/u that is used and it has more ports. The number after it is the number of ports available. Bothe the Evo 1-5 and 1-9 are used because you aren't adding forward and return levels, the only loss is over distance



Official Employee

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??

Yeah I just never heard of the one at your clients house
Gold Problem Solver

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??

Sorry Andrew,

The one at my clients house was the exact same one as mine, a PPC EVO1-5 u/u. I took a very close look at it just to make sure.


andrew.lindsay wrote:
Yeah I just never heard of the one at your clients house



Official Employee

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??

No worries, like i said the evo1-5 and the evo1-9 are the amps of choice and most techs should have access
Frequent Visitor

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??

Hi these all have 0.0db Forward gain and 0.0db Reverse gain ports and 1 modem voip port -3.5db loss.  

unity gain Amplifiers

Antronix VRA900/ACP  does not pass  MOCA

Antronix VRA900B does not pass  MOCA

Extreme IPA1008D-RSVF  does not pass  MOCA

PPC   EVO1-9-U/U does pass MOCA 

Electroline EDA2900MMA  does pass MOCA

 

PPC EVO1-9-U/U does MOCA cost around 30 on ebay also theres another but you can buy 3 PPC for same price as this one here Electroline EDA2900MMA Also Extreme does make one not sure of the model number yet.

I hope this info helps somebody out.

Gold Problem Solver

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??

This thread has been around for awhile however I wanted to add my PPC Evo 1-5 u/u continues to work very well. Any X1 install should probably have this amp or one of the other models just mentioned by lcag123.

 

I believe the key to the success of these amps is active return and 0db return insertion loss. Upstream spec says it can go up to 51 but as I read these forums it appears to me that anything above 45 could be problematic. With the PPC Evo 1-5 u/u, my upstream hovers around 36-38.

 


lcag123 wrote:

Hi These 3 amplifiers are all the same they have 0.0db Forward gain and 0.0db Reverse gain ports and 1 modem voip port -3.5db loss. Ive got the antronix VRA900/ACP and the extreme IPA1008D-RSVF bought them off ebay they both work the same ive not try the ppc one yet. I hope this info helps somebody out.

Antronix VRA900/ACP

Extreme IPA1008D-RSVF

PPC       EVO1-9-U/U




 

 

 

 

 

 

Contributor

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??


cldlhd wrote:

My x1 boxes were fine it was the internet I had issues with. Using the same 4 way splitter I couldn't get higher than 1-2 mbps download although my upload speeds were the same. I connected the input line directly to the internet line using a female to female coupling and they jumped back to 57 mbps down. Hooked back up to the 4 way and they dropped again even though my downstream power ( 5.5 dbmv ) and snr (36 ) were good, thought maybe the splitter was bad so used another one I had with same result. Thinking maybe my modem likes a little more power for whatever reason so I have input into 2 way , one 3.5 leg going right to modem ,other feeding an unbalanced 3 way with the moca filter between the 2 splitters. All three x1 boxes come off the 3 way with the main hub favored on the 3,5.   now x1 main hub,  +7.4 dbmv ,37 snr

                         2 companion boxes, + 6.4 dbmv , 41.9 snr

                     internet /phone modem , +11.5, 37 snr

 

  It's been good since I hooked it up that way even though the modem is borderline high.By the way I noticed when my speeds were slow the first 3 downstream channels on the modem were good but the 4th wouldn't connect.


I had bad experiances with Amps in the past. Larger houses need them for the the TV's to push the signal but when it comes to the Modems they burn them out. We went through 4 Comcast Modems before one technician finally figure out our house had an Amp that was burning them up. He seperated that line bypassing the Amp just for the Internet Modem. Haven't had a Modem burn up since. Of coruse I did had two Routers fried by Lighting twice after that. Luck didn't seem to be on our side that year. ROFL

That is how I first learned about Amps in the past.

 

Anyways I am not sure how X1 is hooked up so I can not say if that would be the case with their new equipement but I would be wearry of having any Internet Modem hooked up to an Amp if I were you all. I will be getting X1 pretty soon myself as I am about to upgrade. When they come out and hook it up that is going to be one of the things I ask them about. I would hate to go through the same situation again.

 

A side note: When the Modem was hooked up to the Amp it caused my speeds to be terrible as well. Throughout all our families houses I have found that the less stuff between the Modem and the Cable Box out in the yard feeding to the house, the better the Internet Connection. Basically the Speeds and stability is better. So the less Spliters you have and or other equipment like Amps the better off your setup will be. I went as far as to rewire the coaxial in one of our houses just so that the modem would have a seperate line in that particular room we had it.

 

Anyways... I just wanted to make sure I mentioned that after I read this thread. Smiley Happy

 

Official Employee

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??

The amps you had were probably not meant for modems to pass through, the Amps for X1 are not amps in the true meaning of amping and there are special ports for modems.
Frequent Visitor

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??

I just moved into a home that was built in 1993 and had comcast come out to install an X1.  The feed from the street comes into the side of my house and the tech noticed I had "old wiring" and "new wiring".  The old wiring has two smaller diameter coax with the insulations fused together.  The new wiring looked to be standard RG6 and the previous owner must have had somebody come out and run this to all the rooms at some point -- lucky for me.

 

The junction box in the street that feeds coax to 4 houses (inlcuding mine) is litterally 10ft away from the line that goes to the side of my house.  The tech hooked up what looked like a portable spectrum analyzer and said my signals are very strong because I'm so close.  He also said that the power to the modem was too high so he put a filter on that line; I'm guessing thats more of an attenuator.  I noticed that the tech didn't install any sort of amp, just a 4 way splitter. 

 

My question for you guys is if this PPC amp is always recommended or is it only needed if the signal levels are not up to snuff?  Since I'm so close to the main feed junction box, perhaps I don't need it.   Also, I see people mentioning red/green dB levels and SNR, where does one go to get this info?   I did have my X1 box lock up today for the first time which required me to hold the power button for 30 seconds to fully reboot it; this has me worried if indeed that PPC amp would have helped prevent this.

 

Thanks

 

P.S.

I'll open up the cable box at the side of my house when I get home from work tonight to see just exactly what filters/splitters were put on.

New Poster

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??

I'm a technician. Hopefully I can shed a little light on this topic. X1 boxes essentially have their own modems built in and access the channels and content on their own. Because of this they need to meet the same signal standards that modems do to function well. The incoming signal level at the X1 box needs to be between -8 and +10 dbmv. Any lower will cause serious reception issues. Any higher can cause issues as well as the box begins to have issues distinguishing between bits. The upstream signal level is important too. This is how high the box has to transmit to be heard at the headend where signals originate. This number needs to be 54 or below. As technicians we strive for less than 51 to give an extra margin for better operation. Splitters cause loss both ways. They reduce incoming signal and require the box to transmit higher to be heard at the head end. If your signals at your various X1 boxes and modems fall within these ranges with the splitter setup you have then a unity gain amp is not needed. If your devices fall outside of those values then you likely need a zero gain amplifier installed in place of the splitters you have now. In most cases that will resolve your issues. Bear in mind that with X1 systems the boxes have to communicate with each other on moca frequencies. The zero gain amps typically have moca filtering installed within them. If this is the case it is best to have all lines attached to the zero gain amp so they are all on the right side of the moca barrier. Any devices that split off before the amplifier will not likely be able to communicate with any devices connected to the amp. Hope that helps. For the record, the PPC 5 and 9 port amps are the devices I use most frequently. They typically do the best job in my opinion.
Gold Problem Solver

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??

Thank you technician for posting this but did it occur to you that this has been discussed over and over and over and over again in this forum and it is far from new information???


Coultergeist0 wrote:
I'm a technician. Hopefully I can shed a little light on this topic. X1 boxes essentially have their own modems built in and access the channels and content on their own. Because of this they need to meet the same signal standards that modems do to function well. The incoming signal level at the X1 box needs to be between -8 and +10 dbmv. Any lower will cause serious reception issues. Any higher can cause issues as well as the box begins to have issues distinguishing between bits. The upstream signal level is important too. This is how high the box has to transmit to be heard at the headend where signals originate. This number needs to be 54 or below. As technicians we strive for less than 51 to give an extra margin for better operation. Splitters cause loss both ways. They reduce incoming signal and require the box to transmit higher to be heard at the head end. If your signals at your various X1 boxes and modems fall within these ranges with the splitter setup you have then a unity gain amp is not needed. If your devices fall outside of those values then you likely need a zero gain amplifier installed in place of the splitters you have now. In most cases that will resolve your issues. Bear in mind that with X1 systems the boxes have to communicate with each other on moca frequencies. The zero gain amps typically have moca filtering installed within them. If this is the case it is best to have all lines attached to the zero gain amp so they are all on the right side of the moca barrier. Any devices that split off before the amplifier will not likely be able to communicate with any devices connected to the amp. Hope that helps. For the record, the PPC 5 and 9 port amps are the devices I use most frequently. They typically do the best job in my opinion.

 

Expert

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??


Coultergeist0 wrote:
I'm a technician. Hopefully I can shed a little light on this topic. X1 boxes essentially have their own modems built in and access the channels and content on their own. Because of this they need to meet the same signal standards that modems do to function well. The incoming signal level at the X1 box needs to be between -8 and +10 dbmv. Any lower will cause serious reception issues. Any higher can cause issues as well as the box begins to have issues distinguishing between bits. The upstream signal level is important too. This is how high the box has to transmit to be heard at the headend where signals originate. This number needs to be 54 or below. As technicians we strive for less than 51 to give an extra margin for better operation. Splitters cause loss both ways. They reduce incoming signal and require the box to transmit higher to be heard at the head end. If your signals at your various X1 boxes and modems fall within these ranges with the splitter setup you have then a unity gain amp is not needed. If your devices fall outside of those values then you likely need a zero gain amplifier installed in place of the splitters you have now. In most cases that will resolve your issues. Bear in mind that with X1 systems the boxes have to communicate with each other on moca frequencies. The zero gain amps typically have moca filtering installed within them. If this is the case it is best to have all lines attached to the zero gain amp so they are all on the right side of the moca barrier. Any devices that split off before the amplifier will not likely be able to communicate with any devices connected to the amp. Hope that helps. For the record, the PPC 5 and 9 port amps are the devices I use most frequently. They typically do the best job in my opinion.

I just had a tech out yesterday (he was great by the way). Had some issues with MoCA levels fluctuating and very high count of bad codewords. The latter was referred to the Headend-in-the-sky team to resolve, the MoCA was due to a bad POE filter (he put in a new type that is quite short and has a built in ground block tab. The tech was an in-house. the lowest MoCA level between the 3 DVRs would drop to 190 and 160 area now all in the 220-240. 

Frequent Visitor

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??

I really appreciate the additional info and explination, the more info the better as far as I'm concerned.  Since I posted that last post I did open up the panel and I noticed that the one line that has a green ground lead hooked to it is still the RG-59 twinax.  I'm hoping I'm wrong but i'm guessing this is the line that carries the signal in from the street.  If that's so, isn't it pretty much a moot point of running RG6 throughout the house if the line between the street and the house is still RG-59?  Who is responsible for that line, is that me or Comcast?  If technology progresses such that RG-59 no longer cuts the mustard, am I on the hook for getting that line replaced with RG-6?

Official Employee

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??

I really appreciate the additional info and explination, the more info the better as far as I'm concerned. Since I posted that last post I did open up the panel and I noticed that the one line that has a green ground lead hooked to it is still the RG-59 twinax. I'm hoping I'm wrong but i'm guessing this is the line that carries the signal in from the street. If that's so, isn't it pretty much a moot point of running RG6 throughout the house if the line between the street and the house is still RG-59? Who is responsible for that line, is that me or Comcast? If technology progresses such that RG-59 no longer cuts the mustard, am I on the hook for getting that line replaced with RG-6?
___________________________

Comcast is responsible for the cable from the house box to the tap/pole, anything inside the house is on the customer.
Gold Problem Solver

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??

It should noted that this is true of all telecom companies, not just Comcast.


ComcastAndrew wrote:
I really appreciate the additional info and explination, the more info the better as far as I'm concerned. Since I posted that last post I did open up the panel and I noticed that the one line that has a green ground lead hooked to it is still the RG-59 twinax. I'm hoping I'm wrong but i'm guessing this is the line that carries the signal in from the street. If that's so, isn't it pretty much a moot point of running RG6 throughout the house if the line between the street and the house is still RG-59? Who is responsible for that line, is that me or Comcast? If technology progresses such that RG-59 no longer cuts the mustard, am I on the hook for getting that line replaced with RG-6?
___________________________

Comcast is responsible for the cable from the house box to the tap/pole, anything inside the house is on the customer.

 

Frequent Visitor

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??


ComcastAndrew wrote:

Comcast is responsible for the cable from the house box to the tap/pole, anything inside the house is on the customer.

Thanks Andrew, I'm really happy to hear that.  If I'm right and the line coming from the street to the house is still the RG-59 twin coax, am I in my right to to request them to replace this with RG6 at Comcast's cost?  If not, what conditions must be met before Comcast (or any telecom) has the responsibility of replacing the line?

 

Thanks!

Gold Problem Solver

Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??

A very quick signal check taken where cable signal enters will determine if it needs to be replaced. No reason to fix it if it ain't broken... If a tech gets a bad signal reading outside of your house, I am sure they would take the needed steps to fix it, including replacing the line if needed.


SiegeX wrote:

ComcastAndrew wrote:

Comcast is responsible for the cable from the house box to the tap/pole, anything inside the house is on the customer.

Thanks Andrew, I'm really happy to hear that.  If I'm right and the line coming from the street to the house is still the RG-59 twin coax, am I in my right to to request them to replace this with RG6 at Comcast's cost?  If not, what conditions must be met before Comcast (or any telecom) has the responsibility of replacing the line?

 

Thanks!





Official Employee
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Re: What is an "X1 Amplifier"??