Welcome to Comcast Help & Support Forums
Find solutions, share knowledge, and get answers from customers and experts

New to the Community? Start here.

5,637,859

members

26

online now

1,815,620

discussions

Back to Top

Three-Way Splitter = Bad Idea?

Posted by
Regular Contributor

Message 1 of 8
24,129 Views

I have both HDTV and HSI with Comcast.

 

I split the incoming signal two ways, with one wire going to my set-top box and the other going to my cable modem. This arrangement seems to be working very well.

 

Now I'm thinking of going for broke and splitting the signal three ways, with the third wire going to the RF connector on my television. This would allow me to have picture-in-picture with the unencrypted (basically, local) channels.

 

Is this a bad idea - will I degrade the signal too much by splitting it three ways? The alternative would be to buy a simple antenna and attach that to my television's RF connector, but there's no way of knowing in advance what kind of reception I'll get.

7 REPLIES
Posted by
Cable Expert

Message 2 of 8
24,124 Views

There is no way to tell if switching to a three-way will hurt your signal until you try it, unless it's checked with a signal level meter.

 

What you do want to look for is a balanced 3-way which has equal loss at all 3 ports, which would be -5.5db loss.  A 2-way is -3.5db at each port.

 

The other type of 3-way is a unbalanced splitter which has -3.5db loss at one port, and -7db loss at  the other two ports.  The unbalanced splittters are really like adding a 2-way behind another 2-way.

 

So going to a balanced splitter would only cause 2db more loss at each port, where using a unbalanced 3-way would cause another -3.5db loss at two of the ports, and loss at the third port would be the same as you have now.

 

If you want to search out a balanced 3-way, look for something similar to these that Comcast uses and approves.  LINK

 

Going to the local Comcast office might only get you another 2-way splitter, where flagging down & asking a Comcast tech would most likely get you a balanced 3-way splitter.

 

Your signal level might very well be strong enough for the loss of the extra ports, and either adding another 2-way behind one of the legs of the existing 2-way might work out.

 

Any more on this, please ask.




Community Icon
I am not a Comcast employee, I am a paying customer just like you!
I am an XFINITY Forum Expert and I am here to help. For information on the program click here.
We ask that you post publicly so people with similar questions may benefit from the conversation.

Was your question answered? Mark it as an accepted solution!solution Icon
Community Icon
I am not a Comcast employee. I am a paying customer just like you!
I am an XFINITY Forum Expert and I am here to help.
We ask that you post publicly so people with similar questions may benefit.

Was your question answered? Mark it as an accepted solution!solution Icon
Community Icon
I am not a Comcast employee.

Was your question answered?
Mark it as a solution!solution Icon

Posted by
Regular Contributor

Message 3 of 8
24,108 Views

Thanks for your help. Unfortunately, I'm not knowledgable enough to know whether an extra 2db of loss from a balanced three-way splitter (5.5db vs. 3.5db) would make any difference in my case. Thus far (with a two-way) I seem to be having trouble whatsoever.

 

Would it be helpful if I measured my existing signal strength and reported the results? I think I can do this from the interface of my Motorola cable modem.

 

On the other hand, considering how little a good quality splitter costs - at Monoprice - I suppose I could just try it and see what happens.

 

 

Posted by
Cable Expert

Message 4 of 8
24,104 Views

2db usually doesn't do much, as if your that close to the edge you will already have some erratic issues.

 

I would only recommend Comcast approved splitters that meet all specs including EMI from Mfr's such as Regal, Antronix, Commscope, Holland and Extreme Broadband.

 

Your source has not proved to me that what they offer meets the specs needed for a modern digital cable system.

 

Hit up a Comcast tech for the proper part.




Community Icon
I am not a Comcast employee, I am a paying customer just like you!
I am an XFINITY Forum Expert and I am here to help. For information on the program click here.
We ask that you post publicly so people with similar questions may benefit from the conversation.

Was your question answered? Mark it as an accepted solution!solution Icon
Community Icon
I am not a Comcast employee. I am a paying customer just like you!
I am an XFINITY Forum Expert and I am here to help.
We ask that you post publicly so people with similar questions may benefit.

Was your question answered? Mark it as an accepted solution!solution Icon
Community Icon
I am not a Comcast employee.

Was your question answered?
Mark it as a solution!solution Icon

Posted by
Regular Contributor

Message 5 of 8
24,090 Views

Okay. I'll talk to Comcast. In my area (Boston) I usually find knowledgable Comcast reps at Best Buy. Thanks again.

Posted by
Visitor
  • Thank you contributor for your first reply to the community!
 Posting replies is the best way to get involved.
  • Congrats on Posting your first topic!

Message 6 of 8
23,956 Views

You will be fine.  I am a tech in VA and our specs for modem is +8 to -8 so as long as you use the -3.5db side for the modem.  That way it will not change your signal for modem.  Comcast doen't provide us with 3-ways no more so to hook up a modem and 2 tv we use a 2-way to a 4-way.  Hope this helps.

Posted by
Gold Problem Solver

Message 7 of 8
23,950 Views
Posted by
Connection Expert

Message 8 of 8
23,946 Views

TechinVA wrote:

 so as long as you use the -3.5db side for the modem.  That way it will not change your signal for modem.


Sure it will. It will technically drop the forward and raise the return by 3.5dB but if the stats are adequate in the first place, it won't matter.



Community Icon
I am not a Comcast employee, I am a paying customer just like you!
I am an XFINITY Forum Expert and I am here to help. For information on the program click here.
We ask that you post publicly so people with similar questions may benefit from the conversation.

Was your question answered? Mark it as an accepted solution!solution Icon
Community Icon
I am not a Comcast employee. I am a paying customer just like you!
I am an XFINITY Forum Expert and I am here to help.
We ask that you post publicly so people with similar questions may benefit.

Was your question answered? Mark it as an accepted solution!solution Icon
Community Icon
I am not a Comcast employee.

Was your question answered?
Mark it as a solution!solution Icon