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  XFINITY WiFi on Demand (XWOD) passes enable non-XFINITY Internet subscribers or current XFINITY Internet subscribers who are not eligible for XFINITY WiFi on Demand to trial or buy access to the Comcast-operated XFINITY WiFi hotspot network for varying periods of time, ranging from an hour to a month, using the open   xfinitywifi   SSID. (Currently, XWOD users are not allowed to access the secure   XFINITY   SSID.)   **Note**:   XFINITY Internet subscribers with 25 Mbps or faster tiers of service have XFINITY WiFi access already included in their subscriptions, and do not need to activate/purchase XWOD passes.   Benefits   Self-Service Portal for XFINITY WiFi On Demand  Users can manage their accounts online through the   XFINITY WiFi On Demand Self-Service Portal. The Self-Service Portal provides the following: Account summary Prior purchases and charges Usage history Access to view or edit contact and billing information and refund requests   Equipment Requirements Please see   XFINITY WiFi and XFINITY WiFi Hotspots app Overview   for information on equipment requirements for XFINITY WiFi On Demand.   Eligibility Non-XFINITY Internet subscribers XFINITY Internet customers who do not qualify for XFINITY WiFi access as part of their service   FAQ's What is XFINITY WiFi On Demand and how is it different from the previos XFINITY WiFi Access Pass program? WiFi On Demand is similar to the previous Access Pass program with both a limited complimentary pass offer and a variety of pay-per-use passes available for extended access.   The first time you see the WiFi On Demand experience, you will need to create a new account. Your existing Access Pass account is no longer active.   How can I purchase a WiFi pass? Passes can be purchased via credit card or debit card by connecting to an XFINITY WiFi hotspot. Visit our   Map   for a list of hotspots, or simply look for “xfinitywifi” in your list of available networks. Passes cannot be purchased by calling customer service.   You will also need a WiFi-enabled device with a browser. On Android devices we recommend using a full browser such as Google Chrome or Firefox to complete your transaction. You may need to manually launch the full browser to navigate to the sign-in screen. Supported device types and OS are available in our   Guides.   Where can I use my WiFi pass? Passes may be used at any of the millions of XFINITY WiFi hotspots. You can find a listing of XFINITY WiFi hotspots on our   Map. Passes are valid only on hotspots with the network name “xfinitywifi”. You can find the network name by clicking on a hotspot on the map or in the list of results.   How many devices can I use my pass on? A pass is valid only on the device it is purchased on.   Can I move my pass to another device? No. A pass is valid only on the device it is purchased on.   Can I carry over any unused time? No, the pass is activated at time of purchase and expires based on the duration indicated. For example: One hour pass – valid for 60 consecutive minutes from time of purchase Two hour pass - valid for two consecutive hours from time of purchase Day Pass - valid for 24 consecutive hours from time of purchase Week Pass - valid for 7 consecutive days from time of purchase 30 Day Pass - valid for 30 consecutive days from time of purchase   I'm having trouble connecting to the network? WiFi access passes rely on connectivity to nearby hotspots. Connectivity issues are typically due to not being close enough to a hotspot. In some cases, your device may see the hotspot but not be close enough to get a good connection. If that happens, you can try to change locations until you receive a strong signal.   What devices do WiFi passes work with? WiFi passes work best on iOS, Android, Windows, and OS X (Mac) devices.   How do I prevent my device from connecting to an XFINITY WiFi Hotspot? Different devices and operating systems use different logic to determine which hotspots to connect to. If you do not want your device to connect to XFINITY WiFi go into your WiFi settings and remove it from the saved networks (select “forget this network” or other similar option).   Who should I contact with WiFi On Demand questions? 24/7 telephone support is available from our customer service team. Call 1-866-489-0919         . You can also see your past pass purchases and manage auto-renew preferences by logging into your   WiFi On Demand account (with valid login).   What happens if I do not verify my email address? When you create a WiFi On Demand account we ask you to validate your email address by responding to a validation email we send you. An email address that is not validated within 72 hours is removed from an account. To add or edit an email address go to your   WiFi On Demand account (with valid login).   What is the refund policy for passes? If you purchased a pass and are unable to use it due to connectivity issues you may request a refund for the time you were unable to use by calling 1-866-489-0919         . Note, the refund amount takes into account the price of shorter duration passes that could have been purchased instead. For example, if you buy a week pass and are only able to use 2 days, your refund would be the price you paid less the cost of 2 day passes.     For the XFINITY WiFi On Demand terms of service for non-Comcast customers see here: http://wifilogin.xfinity.com/wifinonmemberterms.php For the XFINITY WiFi On Demand terms of service for Comcast customers see here: https://www.xfinity.com/support/internet/xfinity-wifi-terms-of-service/     Join the conversation here: http://forums.xfinity.com/t5/Your-Home-Network/XFINITY-WiFi-OnDemand/td-p/2915066
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 Learn about what a home network is and why you need one. A home network is a group of devices – such as computers, game systems, printers, and mobile devices – that connect to the Internet and each other. Home networks connect in two ways: A wired network, which connects devices like printers and scanners with cables A wireless network, which connects devices like tablets and e-readers without cables Why Set Up a Home Network? There are many reasons to establish a home network. Here are just a few of the things home networking allows you to do: Connect to the Internet from multiple computers, game systems, mobile devices, and more. Access files and folders on all devices connected to the network. Print from multiple computers on a single printer. Manage security settings for all networked devices in one place. If you’re ready to try home networking, read below to find out what you’ll need to get started and to see the options available for your network. What You Need to Set Up a Home Network To set up home networking, you’ll need the following: XFINITY Internet Service subscription (or subscription to another Internet provider) A modem, which connects to the Internet, and a router, which connects your devices to each other and to the Internet through your modem (or a gateway, which functions as both a modem and a router) A computer or other device to connect to the network See Set Up Your Wireless Gateway and Connect Your Wireless Network for more information.  The Wireless Gateway 1 (model numbers TG852G, TG862G, SMCD3GNV, TC8305C) and Wireless Gateway 2 (model number DPC3939) function as an all-in-one modem, router, and phone device. They automatically provide users with the best security settings available for a home network. See What is a Wireless Gateway from Comcast? for more information.  Wireless Home Network A wireless network, often called Wi-Fi, connects devices to each other and to the Internet without using cables. See What Is WiFi and How Do I Get It? for more information. Wired Home Network A wired home network connects devices to each other and to the Internet using Ethernet cables. There are several benefits to having a wired home network: Faster and more reliable connection to the Internet Increased security, as no outside users can access your network Easier set-up and troubleshooting than wireless connections Mixed Home Network Many people find that a mix of wireless and wired networking meets their needs best. For instance, devices that stream movies benefit from the quicker and more stable wired connection. Devices like laptops or tablets, however, benefit from the mobility available with a wireless connection. Both the Wireless Gateway 1 and Wireless Gateway 2 come with wireless capability and four Ethernet ports, allowing you to connect devices with and without cables at the same time. Home Networking Glossary Below is a list of common home networking terms. Take a moment to familiarize yourself with these definitions, as they'll likely be mentioned in other help articles. Wireless network – A group of devices (computers, game systems, e-readers, etc.) connected to each other and to the Internet without cables, also called Wi-Fi. Modem – A device that connects routers or computers to the Internet through a cable. Router – A device that transmits a wireless signal and connects devices to each other and the Internet through the modem. Gateway – A device that functions as both a modem and a router, like the Wireless Gateway 1 or Wireless Gateway 2. Signal range – The area in which a wireless-capable device can pick up the wireless signal and connect to the wireless network.   Administration site – The online site used to view and change the settings of a router and wireless network, called the Admin Tool for the Wireless Gateway 1 and Wireless Gateway 2.     Router username and password – The login information used to access the administration site. Network Name (SSID) – The name of a wireless network. Network Password (Key) – The password used to connect to a wireless network.  
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Once you have WiFi in your home, you’ll want to make sure you’re getting the most out of your connection. Older equipment and poor network configuration can slow down the speed of your WiFi connection in your home, which could lead to slower downloads, lagging online games and streaming video, and overall slower Internet performance. What else can impact the speed or performance of your network? Number of WiFi devices on your home network Interference from neighboring WiFi networks Limitations of individual WiFi devices Distance between the wireless gateway and your WiFi-enabled device (i.e. mobile phone, tablets, laptop, etc.) Physical factors (i.e. home construction, apartment vs. single home) Here are a few ways to improve your WiFi network.       Wireless Gateway Placement The placement and location of your wireless gateway can affect the WiFi radio signal strength and speed of your connection. For best WiFi coverage, ensure your wireless gateway is elevated (off of the floor) and in an upright position. Place your wireless gateway in a central area where you’ll most commonly use your WiFi devices. In general, an open space is better than a crowded space.   Minimize Interference For the best WiFi reception and the least interference from nearby wireless networks, place your wireless gateway in an open area, away from: Walls Furniture Metal surfaces (including computer cases) Halogen/fluorescent lighting Microwaves and refrigerators TVs and computer monitors Cordless phones (excluding DECT or 900MHz models) Baby monitors Large amounts of water (like aquariums and water heaters) Keep in mind that the WiFi-capable devices you connect to your in-home network play as important a role as the wireless gateway when it comes to range and speed issues. Additionally, locations that tend to have high WiFi usage, such as crowded neighborhoods and apartments, may affect your speeds, especially during peak hours.   Other Considerations If you use a separate router along with the wireless gateway, make sure the wireless gateway is in bridge mode. (See   Enable or Disable Bridge Mode on a Wireless Gateway.) To find out more about wireless networking, please see   What is WiFi?   to find out what WiFi is and how it works. For information on home networking and how to set up a home network, see   What is Home Networking?   Upgrading Your Modem Comcast provides several levels of Internet service offering different speeds, such as Performance, Blast! and Extreme 105 or Extreme 150. Your level of service is listed on your billing statement. Because some older modems and gateways can’t adequately support higher levels of Internet service, you may still be accessing the Internet at slower speeds, even if you’ve upgraded your plan. If you lease a modem/gateway from Comcast, you’ll want to upgrade your modem/gateway to make sure you’re getting the fastest network speeds possible. You can find a list of Comcast-approved modems and their specifications at the   DOCSIS Device Information Center. To find out more about upgrading your equipment, see   Upgrade Your Wireless Network Equipment.   For more information, see https://customer.xfinity.com/help-and-support/internet/improve-your-wireless-home-network/
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For best WiFi coverage, try to place your wireless gateway close to where you most frequently use your WiFi-capable devices. For best WiFi reception and minimal interference, place your wireless gateway in an open area away from items such as exterior walls, metal surfaces, microwaves and windows. Once you’ve ensured the Comcast wireless gateway is in the best location in your home, it’s time to plug it in and power it up. Note:   If you are replacing a modem currently connected in your home, be sure to unplug that device from the cable or coaxial outlet and plug the new modem into that same outlet. If you do not have an existing modem set up, simply plug your new modem into the main cable or coaxial outlet in your home.   Overview Once you set up your network, you can wirelessly access the Internet and other XFINITY services from your computer, laptop, game system and more. Your wireless gateway or wireless router makes it easy to set up your network and adjust your settings. Before you begin, you can find out more information about wireless networking at   What is Home Networking?, or you can find out how to set up a wireless network with these simple steps. These steps are specific to customers with the following equipment: Wireless Gateway 1 (model numbers TG852G, TG862G, SMCD3DNV, or TC8305C) Wireless Gateway 2 (model number DPC3939) Wireless Gateway 3 (model numbers DPC3941T and TC8717) Other routers may have some variations   Connect Your Wireless Gateway Before you can access XFINITY services or the Internet through your wireless gateway, you'll need to make sure it's properly connected. Please check that: Your wireless gateway is connected to the Internet through the   Cable connector   on the back panel with a coaxial cable.   Wireless gateway back panel features are: Reset button   for resetting the wireless gateway USB host connector   [for future use] Tel1 connector   for analog phone line Tel2 connector   for analog phone line Gigabit Ethernet (1-4) connectors   for use with a computer LAN port Cable connector   for the coaxial cable Power connector   for the power cord   Your wireless gateway is plugged into a power source through the   Power connector   with the provided power cord. The   Power, US/DS, and   Online   LED indicators on the front panel are steadily lit. This may take several minutes after plugging in your wireless gateway.   How To Self-Install Internet   How To Self-Install Internet & Voice     Now you are ready to activate your Comcast services and your wireless gateway.   Activating Your Wireless Gateway   Once you've installed your Wireless Gateway device and established a temporary Internet connection, you're ready to activate your XFINITY Internet/Voice service.   See information about preparing to activate your Wireless Gateway. This article outlines the on-screen instructions to complete the activation of your Gateway. If you're activating an XFINITY xFi Gateway (models Arris 1682G, Cisco 3941T or Arris TG3482G), see   Activating Your XFINITY xFi Gateway. To determine the type of gateway you have, check the make and model information located on the bottom of your device. You can also check this information in   My Account.   Activation Instructions Once connected to the Internet, if you're not automatically presented with an   Activation Welcome   screen: Open a web browser (such as Chrome, Safari, Internet Explorer, etc.) on your device and go to   xfinity.com/activate. Click   Continue.   Enter your XFINITY account number and phone number (If you received a Self Installation Kit, your account number can be found on the   Activation Information   card inside the kit.). You can also authenticate your account by signing in with your XFINITY username. If you've already created a username, click on   Sign in here   and skip steps 3 through 5 below.   Create an XFINITY username and password. If you have moved and are transferring your XFINITY service(s) to a new address, click   Sign in with your existing username. Choose a security question and answer (answer must be 3-25 characters long and is case-sensitive), and check the box that you agree to the Terms and Privacy policy, then click   Continue. Note:   Your XFINITY username provides access to your account settings and XFINITY services. It will also become your email address prefix, as in [Username]@comcast.net. Feel free to use it as your primary email account or as a spare. We recommend writing down this important information.   Click   Continue   to proceed from the   Connection Established   screen.   After you receive the   Device Activated   screen, your gateway may reboot. It should be all set when the   Power,   US/DS   and   Online   lights on the front of your gateway stop blinking and remain solid for one minute, and the   WiFi   light(s) start flashing.   Notes: You can continue to use the WiFi network name and password on your device, but we recommend that you   change your name and password   to something easy to remember. Depending on the type of gateway you have, you may be required to create a new WiFi network name and password as part of the activation process.   Need Additional Help? If you're having trouble activating your gateway or XFINITY services, please call 1-855-OK-BEGIN (1-855-652-3446). For more information about XFINITY Internet, visit   Xfinity.com/internethelp.
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 This article provides details on the personalization and control features available with XFINITY xFi. For more information on the xFi web portal and app for mobile devices, see our   xFi portal and app overview article. For xFi troubleshooting tips, see   troubleshooting WiFi connectivity.   Devices   How To Manage Devices with XFINITY xFi   In the   Devices   section, you can view all devices that are currently or were previously connected to your home network. Active   devices are those currently connected to your home network. Paused   devices are those whose WiFi access is currently paused. Inactive   devices are those which are not currently connected to your home network.   Identifying Devices When a device first connects to your home network, the default name of the device, which is either the manufacturer-set name (i.e., hostname or MAC address) or the one you gave your device when you first set it up, will be displayed. If you do not recognize a device: Select the device, then select   Device Details   to see the manufacturer. If the device is connected to your home network, there should be a green dot indicating that it's online, which may also help with identifying what device it is. Access the hostname or MAC address in your device's settings. If the default name displayed is a long string of numbers and letters, it's likely the MAC address.   Personalizing and Organizing Devices You can personalize a device name for easier reference. Select the device to give it a nickname and choose an icon, then assign the device to a profile. If you have devices connected to your home network that still need to be personalized, you'll see that indicated at the top of the   Devices   section. Simply select   Personalize   to nickname and assign to a profile.   Device Indicators A   green dot   indicates the device is currently connected to your home network.   A   pause symbol   indicates the device is currently paused and cannot access your home network.   A   crescent moon symbol   indicates the device is currently in Bedtime Mode.   A   grayed-out device   icon means the device is not currently connected to your home network.     Removing Devices You can remove an inactive (disconnected) device from the   Devices   section by selecting the name of the device, then   Device Details > Forget Device. This will remove the device from the   Devices   section and unassign it from the profile it was associated with, if applicable. It will also permanently delete all historical network activity of this device. If the device reconnects to your home network, it will appear as a new device.     Pausing Devices Pausing a device blocks it from accessing the Internet when connected to your home network. In-progress activity might not stop immediately. Access to local network devices (like printers) and connections that use cellular data or other WiFi networks won't be paused. To pause an individual device simply select the device and then select   Pause Device. You can either pause the device for a specific amount of time (for example, 30 minutes, one hour or two hours) or indefinitely until you choose to unpause the device. When attempting to access the Internet on a paused device, the user will see the device's default message that the site cannot be reached or that it is not connected to the Internet.   How To Pause Devices with XFINITY xFi Note:   If you've previously set up a device block from your Gateway's Admin Tool (http://10.0.0.1), you should see the device listed with a pause icon in xFi indicating WiFi access over your home network is already paused. Once you Pause/Unpause a device or access Bedtime Mode or Port Forwarding through xFi, you will no longer be able to access similar features (block, scheduled block or port forwarding) through the Gateway's Admin Tool (http://10.0.0.1).   People   How To Manage People and Profiles with XFINITY xFi     In the   People   section, you can organize all of your connected devices by the people who use them. Once you've created profiles, you'll be able to access additional features to manage your home network, including the ability to set Parental Controls.   Creating Profiles You can manage devices connected to your home network more efficiently by assigning them to a profile. Create a profile for an individual (e.g., John, Mom) or group (e.g., Kids), then assign their devices to that profile. You can create profiles from the   People   section by selecting   Create Profile, or during the process of naming a device in the   Devices   section. After you create a profile, it will appear in the   People   section. For all the devices assigned to that profile, you can view how active they are on your home network, see which devices are online, instantly pause WiFi access, set a bedtime, and enable Parental Controls. In addition to the custom profiles you create, we provide two profiles for you to use: Household   - can be used to assign smart home devices (e.g., Smart TV, thermostat, security system, door locks) Guest   - can be used to assign visitors' devices These profiles will only appear in the   People   section if a device is assigned to them; they cannot be deleted.   Pause All Devices You can block a profile or group of devices from accessing the Internet when connected to your home network by selecting   Pause All. You can either pause the devices for a specific amount of time (for example, 30 minutes, one hour or two hours) or indefinitely until you choose to unpause the devices. Once a profile is paused, any new device assigned to that profile will be paused. Please note that any in-progress activity might not stop immediately. Additional details about pausing a device are included   above.   Bedtime Mode Bedtime Mode allows you to automatically pause WiFi access over your home network during scheduled times for all devices assigned to a profile. For example, you can pause kids' WiFi access during dinnertime or bedtime. Different schedules can be set for school nights (Sunday - Thursday) and weekends (Friday - Saturday). To set Bedtime Mode, select a profile, then select   Edit   next to   Bedtime Mode. Select the desired nights for Bedtime Mode and the   sleep   and   wake   times. All devices assigned to that profile will then be paused during the sleep times selected. Note:   If you've previously set up a scheduled block for a device(s) from your Gateway's Admin Tool (http://10.0.0.1), you should be alerted when you attempt to set up Bedtime Mode that your prior settings will be cleared. Once you access Bedtime Mode, Pause/Unpause a device or access Port Forwarding through xFi, you will no longer be able to access similar features (scheduled block, block or port forwarding) through the Gateway's Admin Tool (http://10.0.0.1).   How To Set Bedtimes and Manage Parental Controls with XFINITY xFi Parental Controls Parental Controls help reduce the risk of children accessing age-inappropriate content from their devices. To set Parental Controls, select a profile, then select   Edit   next to   Parental Controls. Next, select   On   to only allow access to content deemed appropriate for all ages. The following third-party settings are applied to profiles that have xFi Parental Controls enabled: Google SafeSearch: On Bing SafeSearch: Strict YouTube Restricted Mode: On If a device assigned to that profile attempts to access a website or app known to host inappropriate content for that level, a block page will be displayed. In the case of secure websites or mobile applications, the block page may not be displayed, but access is still prevented.   Home Network Activity In addition to viewing aggregate network activity for all profiles and devices on your home network in the   Overview   section, you can view activity for individual devices and profiles. Simply select a device or profile to view network activity over the past 24 hours and the past 30 days.
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If you are experiencing any problems with your Comcast internet connection, the suggestions below may provide some assistance with identifying and potentially resolving the issue. If you are still experiencing any connection issues after following these suggestions, please start a new topic on the forums.   Check if there is an outage The   XFINITY My Account mobile app   for iOS and Android devices can provide you with information in the event of an outage. You can also log into your   Comcast account   and click the   check for service interruptions   link.   Recent changes in your service If you recently changed any of your Comcast services or had your service recently installed, verify with a Comcast representative that there are no provisioning or modem registration issues on your account.   Troubleshooting tools Speed Experience Check   - This tool attempts to analyze your connection and automatically troubleshoots some common issues. IPv6 Readiness Test   - Check to see if an IPv6 issue might be causing your symptoms.   Check your signal levels To view your modem’s status page go to  http://192.168.100.1  or  http://10.0.0.1   Specification      Min             Max Downstream Power Level     * Cable Modems -10dBmV +10dBmV * Gateways and EMTAs -7dBmV +7dBmV Downstream Signal to Noise Ratio 35dB 50dB Upstream Power Level +35dBmV +50dBmV Upstream Signal to Noise Ratio 31dB - Upstream Receive Power -2dBmV +2dBmV Note: Not all modems will allow you to view the status page and some will have different URLs to access this info. If you are unable to access your modem’s status page, you can contact Comcast Customer Support and ask the support representative for these values.   Using an approved modem If you've had your modem for awhile, it may have reached End of Life (EOL) status. You can view modem compatibility info by visiting the   My Device Info   site.   Powercycle all of your equipment Try powering all of your network equipment off, wait a few minutes, then power all equipment back on. When performing this procedure, first turn off the computer; then unplug the power from the back of the modem. If you have a telephony modem you can use the reset button (if available) or remove the battery. If you are using a router, disconnect the power cord from this also. After a few minutes, start by plugging the power back into the modem first and wait a minute or two for the modem lights to indicate an online status. Then plug in the power to the router and wait a few moments for this to come online. Lastly, turn on the computer and try your connection again to see if the issue is resolved. You can watch the   Reset Your Cable Modem or Voice Modem video   to learn how to properly reset your device.   Inspect coax lines Inspect as much of the coaxial cable line leading up to your cable modem for signs of extreme bends, cuts, loose or corroded connectors. If possible, try inspecting the coaxial lines from the point this cable enters your home up to the point where it connects to your cable modem. If you see a section of cable or any connectors that are damaged, try replacing the section of cable. Also, try disconnecting and re-connecting all of the coaxial connections that lead up to your cable modem to ensure each connection is tight, corrosion-free, and that the coaxial tip visible at each connection end is not bent. Coax should be RG6 with compression fittings.   Splitters Each splitter that is added to your cable line will degrade the cable signal slightly and may cause slower connection speeds or frequent modem disconnections. Normally, you should have one main splitter installed where the cable line enters your home with one branch feeding to the cable modem directly and the other branch feeding to all the TVs in the home. If you have multiple splitters on the coaxial line leading up to your cable modem, try by-passing these splitters and running a single coaxial line directly to your cable modem, if possible. This may disconnect any TVs that may be connected from these splitters but if this improves your modem connection, the problem can be attributed to either a faulty splitter that needs to be replaced or a potential signal problem that may require a technician visit. Splitters should be of good quality and broadband compliant. The label should read 5-1000Mhz (or 1Ghz).   Routers If you have a router connected to your cable modem that allows multiple computers to connect to the Internet, try bypassing the router to see if the connection improves. To bypass the router, disconnect the power cord from your cable modem and then connect one computer directly to the cable modem with one Ethernet cable. Once connected, plug the power cord back to the modem, wait for the modem lights to settle and indicate an online status and then try your connection again to see if the issue is resolved. If yes, then you may have a faulty router or you should troubleshoot the router firmware and settings to resolve the connection issue.   Check your IP lease time Comcast routinely performs maintenance on the network to keep things updated and running smoothly. If you are still experiencing connection issues after the above suggestions have been tried, look for your IP lease time to see if there may be network being performed in your area. To see your IP lease time, in Windows, go to Start->Run and type cmd and press Enter (if you are using Windows 98 or ME, type command and press Enter). This should present a black DOS prompt where you will need to type ipconfig/all and press Enter. Look towards the bottom of the returned information for the Lease Obtained and Lease Expired lines – if this shows a time of approximately one hour, there may be some maintenance being performed on the network and you should try your connection again after a few hours to allow time for the maintenance to be completed. Note: the IP lease time will generally be around 4 to 7 days.   Check your speed   XFINITY Speed Test   - A simple speed test tool. XFINITY Speed Test   (beta) - An improved version of the speed test tool, now in public beta.   Speed Tier Download Speed Upload Speed Economy Plus   grandfathered 3 Mbps 768 kbps Internet 5   not available in all areas 5 Mbps 1Mbps Internet Essentials 10 Mbps 1 Mbps Performance Starter 10 Mbps 2 Mbps Performance 25   West 25 Mbps 5 Mbps Performance   Northeast/Central 25 Mbps 5 Mbps Performance   West 50 Mbps 5 Mbps Performance Pro   Northeast & select West markets 100 Mbps 5 Mbps Blast!   Northeast 200 Mbps 10 Mbps Blast!   Grandfathered in previously available Atlanta and Nashville areas 75 Mbps 10 Mbps Blast!   West select markets 105 Mbps 10 Mbps Blast! Pro   Select Atlanta, Nashville and Chicago markets 100 Mbps 10 Mbps Blast! Pro   West select markets 200 Mbps 10 Mbps Extreme 105   grandfathered 105 Mbps 20 Mbps Extreme 150   Northeast - grandfathered 150 Mbps 20 Mbps Extreme 150   Central 150 Mbps 20 Mbps Extreme 150   West - not available in all areas 150 Mbps 20 Mbps Extreme 250   West - not available in all areas 250 Mbps 25 Mbps Extreme 300   Available in select markets of Atlanta and Nashville and in all of the Greater Chicago Region 300 Mbps 25 Mbps Extreme 505   grandfathered 505 Mbps 100 Mbps Gigabit   Advanced consumer trial available in Atlanta, Nashville, Chicago and select Detroit regions 1 Gbps 35 Mbps Gigabit Pro   not available in all markets 2Gb 2Gb Note: The above chart is designed to provide general information. All tiers listed are advertised speeds. If you are unsure of your speed tier, a Comcast representative can provide that information.   Update your operating system and security programs Make sure your operating system is updated and make sure your antivirus, firewall, and anti-spyware/adware programs are up-to-date. Once you have updated your security programs, please make sure you run a complete antivirus and anti-spyware/adware scan on your computer.   Firewalls Firewalls can cause problems if not properly configured. If you have a firewall installed on your computer and are having connection problems, try turning it off briefly.   Traceroutes and ping tests Running a ping test or traceroute to an IP address can be a helpful tool to troubleshoot routing problems. However, there are some things that you should and   should not   do when running these tests: You should... Run a test to an IP address on the Internet, such as a web server, email server or other computer that should have high-availability and is designed to accept ICMP traffic. Run a test to a local IP address   on your network   such as a router or another computer. Run a test to your modem/gateway's   local   IP address, such as   192.168.100.1   or   10.0.0.1 . This can help determine connectivity between your computer and your modem. You shouldn't... Run a test to a CMTS or node. The network interfaces in these pieces of equipment are designed to de-prioritize ICMP traffic and will provide false-positives. Run a test to 75.75.75.75, 75.75.76.76 or other Comcast DNS server. These servers de-prioritize ICMP traffic and will provide false-positives. Run a test to your modem/gateway's   external   IP address while on your network. Run a test while connected to a VPN service. Run a test while connected wirelessly, unless a comparison test will be performed while   directly connected   to the modem/gateway. Running a traceroute Sometimes it is helpful to run a trace if you are having difficulty with a specific destination or service. Windows 7 or later: Click   Start   ->   Run   and type   cmd   and press Enter. This will open the command prompt/DOS window. When open, type   tracert   www.comcast.net and hit enter. When it is finished, you will see a   Trace complete   message. Right click, mark, drag over the text, copy by hitting "Enter", and then hit "Enter" again to paste the trace results into a subreddit post. Mac OS X: Open the   Applications   ->   Utilities   ->   Network Utility   and select the Traceroute tab. Enter an address such as   www.comcast.net   and start the trace. When completed, copy and paste the results to your subreddit post using normal copy and paste methods. Running a ping test Windows 7 or later: Click   Start   ->   Run   and type   cmd   and press Enter. This will open the command prompt/DOS window. When open, type   ping -t   www.comcast.net and then press enter. The output will look like this: Pinging www.comcast.net with 32 bytes of data Reply from 204.127.195.15: bytes=32 time=75ms TTL=46 Reply from 204.127.195.15: bytes=32 time=75ms TTL=46 Let this run for about a minute or so and press   Ctrl   and   C   to stop it. In the output, look for how often a Request timed out message appears and also look to see that the   time=XXms part of each reply is as low as possible - below 100ms under ideal circumstances. Right click, mark, drag over the text, copy by hitting "Enter", and then hit "Enter" again to paste the ping results into your post. Mac OS X: Open the   Applications   ->   Utilities   ->   Network Utility   and select the Ping tab. Enter an address such as   www.comcast.net, set the number of pings for about 100, and start the ping.   Message last edited by nerdburg on 1-23-2017
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Question  I have no Internet access.  I've noticed that the US and DS buttons on the modem are blinking, which they didn't do before. What does this mean?   Answer   This issue tends to be related to your modem not able to correctly connect to wifi service. Have you tried unplugging the modem from the power source, waiting 30 seconds and then plugging it back in? If worse comes to worse and you really need to, you can reset your modem back to factory defaults by taking a pin (or other small object) and inserting it into the "Reset" inset button on the back of the modem.     - OR -   **NOTE**: This Factory Reset will take all your modem settings back to whatever they were when they left the factory, including WiFi names/passwords.       You can also reset your device remotely by: Download the Xfinity My Account app from Apple iTunes or Google Play; you can also search your mobile device's app store for "XFINITY My Account". Sign in using your XFINITY username and tap   Internet   at the bottom of the home screen.  Tap  Restart device  on the  XFINITY Internet  screen and tap it again to initiate the restart process for your wireless gateway.                                                                                                                                                                                                                               You will see a message confirming that a restart signal was sent to your wireless gateway. You also have the ability to indicate whether or not the restart resolved your connection issue.                                                                                                                                                                                         Choosing  Yes  displays a message to conclude the restart flow; tap  Done  to exit. Choosing  No  displays a page providing you with additional resources; tap one of the options listed or tap  Done  to exit.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       For more information on resetting your device see here:  https://www.xfinity.com/support/internet/troubleshooting-your-cable-modem/     If the unplugging it doesn't work, or if your other services are down, you will need to get a Comcast technician out to your house. If you are not able to get an employee here to schedule a tech for you, you may need to call in to 1-800-COMCAST (1-800-266-2278) or use chat support here: https://customer.xfinity.com/help-and-support/chat     Read more here: http://forums.xfinity.com/t5/Your-Home-Network/No-Internet-connection-US-and-DS-lights-blinking-on-modem/m-p/1578823#M176787
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Comcast's High Speed Internet service is a wonderful thing, and many of us have come to depend on it for many things, from sending email to friends and family, to playing games, to managing our finances, to working at our jobs at home. In households where there is more than one computer, it's becoming more and more common to see routers used to network these computers together to share the same Internet connection. Wireless routers are a very popular choice, especially with laptop users and in those places where it's impractical to run an ethernet cable. But along with them comes some extra security concerns specific to wireless that should be addressed so the user's computers and network are not exposed to needless risk from the more unsavory elements in the Internet community. Since you do not need direct physical access to use a wireless router, how do you ensure that only you and those you approve can use your router? Thankfully, that's an easy question to answer. The router itself can help you with this, it has many configurable options that allow you to control its wireless function so that you can be as secure as you like. I'll walk through a typical wireless router setup using the Linksys WRT54G as my example. I'll describe the various options that effect wireless security and you can decide what settings are right for your particular situation. Wireless routers come in all shapes and sizes and they don't all share the same options, so I may describe an option your router doesn't have, or you may have an option mine lacks. When in doubt, RTFM. Let me say that again,   READ THE DARN MANUAL!   Phew, glad I got that off my chest. Your router's manual is an invaluable source of information about your specific model, use it. At the bottom are links to other posts which describe connecting to a secured router from XP, Vista, and a Mac. Here come the details, so take a deep breath and dive right in... Router Configuration To change these router options, we're going to be using the WRT54G's Web based Setup pages. Most routers have a tiny built-in webserver you can just point your favorite browser at, login, and make whatever changes you need. On my router, I simply use   http://192.168.1.1   (which is just the router's LAN side IP address). This is pretty standard on most Linksys routers. Other manufacturers might use   http://192.168.0.1   or   http://192.168.2.1, or   http://10.0.0.1,   for example. Consult your pesky documentation for what you should use on your router. Once connected, you should be presented with a login dialog that looks similar to   this. Enter the router's administration password and press   OK. The default password on Linksys routers is usually "admin" with no userid. You should then see   your router's home page. Take a few minutes, poke around and familiarize yourself with the way your router's website works and where the various pages and options are. One important thing to note with Linksys routers, once you make a change to an option, be VERY CERTAIN to click on   Save Settings   at the bottom of the page or you will never actually turn that option on. So anywhere I say change an option, remember to hit Save before you continue to another page or the change will be lost. You have been warned   . Now let's get right down to the security changes: 1. Change the router's administration password. Strictly speaking this option has nothing to do with the wireless function itself but since it's such basic security, it bears repeating. Your router comes with a default password, but everyone knows what this password is, so it's no protection at all. Change it to something only you know. On the WRT54G, go to the   Administration --> Management   page, enter the Router Password and confirm it. Then press the Save Settings button at the bottom of the page. You will be presented with a logon dialog again, just use the new password. 2. Disable the ability to get to the router's web setup pages from a wireless system. This is probably of minor usefulness, but I like to be as thorough as possible. Disabling this option means you have to use a system directly connected to the router (or through the Internet, more on that in a minute) in order to make changes to the router. A couple of caveats here. If you only have wireless systems, leave this enabled or you won't be able to control your router! Also, if you're doing this procedure from a wireless system, you'll need to move to a wired system to complete further changes. So think about your needs before clicking here. On the WRT54G, this option is "Wireless Web Access" on the   Administration --> Management   page. Don't forget   Save Settings   to lock the change in. 3. Disable the ability to control to the router from the Internet. By default this option ("Remote Management") should be disabled and you should leave it that way unless you have a specific need to allow this. Valid reasons include: you're away from home and need to adjust the VPN passthrough settings, or you want someone on the Internet to help you do some troubleshooting, etc. Bear in mind that you have no control over WHO on the Internet is allowed to connect, other than controlling the password. Think long and hard before enabling this option. If you do, consider using HTTPS so that information going back and forth to the connected user is encrypted and protected from prying eyes. You will find this option on   Administration --> Management   page. 4. Disable UPnP. This is just plain evil and allows a program to configure the router without your knowledge. Unless you have some very specific need for this, disable it. Again, on the   Administration --> Management   page. 5.   Disable SSID broadcasting. By default, most wireless routers sit around constantly shouting to anyone in range who can listen "HELLO OUT THERE! I'M RIGHT HERE AND MY NAME IS XYZ! COME USE ME!". Not very secure. What you want is an access point that sits there quietly and unobtrusively until someone comes along who already knows the access point is there AND knows its name. In order words without foreknowledge, the access point is mostly invisible. Now the more knowledgeable among you might be saying "Hold on, that's not true!" and you'd be technically correct, but this will prevent the majority of ne'er-do-wells from finding you, and that's a good thing. It's true a really smart and determined hacker will still know you're there, but that requires smarts and effort which is severely lacking in your typical script-kiddie. Now when you do this, the onus is now on you to specifically configure your various wireless clients with the proper (case sensitive) SSID for your wireless router. Since the router is no longer broadcasting, you can't bring up the XP wireless client (for example) so you can see your router. You have to add it by hand. This is a simple process, just see the instructions for your wireless client on how to do this. Change this option with   Wireless SSID Broadcast   set to Disable on the   Wireless --> Basic Wireless Settings   page and press   Save Settings.    EDIT 08/24/2011: I   have decided to remove this section, not because it's a bad idea (I do it here), but because it has the side effect I mention above about making it harder to connect (which is it's purpose).  With the proliferation of wireless devices (cell phones with WiFi, iPads, laptops, blue-ray players, game systems, etc), more and more folks with limited wireless knowledge find connecting to their router much harder if the router is not broadcasting.  After trying to explain unsuccessfully to countless people why their wireless network really IS there, I've decided this option is more trouble than it's worth for most folks.  So from now on, I only recommend this option for people who have a solid technical understanding of their wireless network and how turning off SSID broadcasting effects their wireless client setup. 6. Change the default SSID (or Service Set Identifier) to something unique. A wireless access point has to have a name associated with it called the SSID. All the access points (there might be more than one, but in our setup there is only one, the wireless router itself) in a single wireless network will share the same name and the same security setup. Most routers come with a default value here. For example, all Linksys wireless access points have a default SSID of "linksys" (original, huh?) You want to give your router a unique SSID that only you know. The SSID must be no more than 32 alphanumeric characters and it IS case sensitive, so that "charlie" is different and distinct from "Charlie". Supply your chosen SSID in the   Wireless Network Name   field on the   Wireless --> Basic Wireless Settings   page. 7. Enable Wireless MAC filtering.   Please do not confuse MAC (media access control) address with the Apple Macintosh computer, they are two totally different things.   Each wireless adapter has a unique hardware address that can be used to identify that particular wireless adapter. The router has the ability to accept or deny connections based on this MAC address. You can set this up to deny or allow access to a list of specific MAC addresses. I use the more restrictive of the two, which is only allow access to MAC addresses I have listed. On the   Wireless --> Wireless MAC Filter   page, select Enable for   Wireless MAC Filter, select   Permit only, press Save Settings, then press   Edit MAC Filter List, enter your wireless adapter's MAC address in the   list, press Save Settings and you're done. To find your adapter's MAC address, on XP/2K /ME, use the command   ipconfig /all   and find the Physical Address field for the wireless adapter. On 95/98, use   winipcfg   and select the wireless adapter, you're also looking for Physical Address. On Linux, use   /sbin/ifconfig   and you're looking for "HWaddr". On the Mac,   ifconfig   also works in the Terminal, and here you're looking for the "ethernet" field which is kind of misnamed, or you can also use Applications:Utilities:Network Utility and on the Info tab select the wireless adapter (on my PowerBook, it's en1) and you want the Hardware Address.  For those that have lots of people or devices coming and going and want to allow access, this option can be troublesome and I would recommend turning it off in those situations.  Also remember this a year down the road when you have a fancy new iPad that you are trying to connect and it won't work, did you remember to add the new device's MAC address to the table if you this option enabled? 8. Turn on wireless encryption. This is the single most important thing you can do to secure your wireless router. There are two main encryption methods in use at this point, the older and not very secure WEP, and the newer, more secure WPA. Unless you have some overriding reason to use WEP (like your adapter driver won't support WPA), stay far away from it. It's easily cracked and there are open source programs that do this. Last resort use only and then you must change the keys OFTEN (once a week at least). Always use WPA whenever possible. To activate WPA, go to the   Wireless --> Wireless Security   page, select   WPA Personal   for   Security Mode,   AES   for   WPA Algorithms(don't select   TKIP, it's been partially cracked), and some phrase for the   WPA Shared Key. The key phrase must be between 8 and 63 characters long.  the more random the better.  Short phrases made up of common words found in the dictionary are not good choises since there are brute force dictionary attacks that can crask WPA if you choose such a weak passphrase.  If you have   WPA2 Personal   avaliable to you, that's a better choice than   WPA Personal   since it requires   AES. Press   Save Settings   to save the changes. Mac OS X Wireless Client Configuration How to Connect to a Secured Wireless Router - Mac OS X If you are configuring a laptop like a PowerBook and use more than one wireless access point (or WAP) regularly, you can create new locations using the   Apple -> Location -> Network Preferences -> Edit Locations   option. For example, you can have a Home and a Work location, each of which has their own default secured network, or maybe you often meet friends at Starbuck's, you can create a location for that network as well. You switch locations easily by using the Apple menu on the menu bar,   Apple -> Locationand select the location you want. Makes going back and forth from your home network to the network at the office (or anywhere else for that matter) very simple. XP Wireless Client Configuration   How to Connect to a Secured Wireless Router - Windows XP Windows Vista Client Configuration How to connect to a Secured Wireless Router - Windows Vista 26-Apr-2005 Added Mac OS X Panther client instructions 02-Mar-2008 Added Vista setup link 07-Nov-2008 Changed TKIP to AES as the preferred encryption algorithm 08-Nov-2008 Removed old Mac instructions, replaced with link to post with Mac instructions 18-Nov-2008 Added XP instructions link, finally! 24-Aug-2011 Changed my stance on #5 SSID broadcasting   Message Edited by Baric on   11-18-2008   03:28 AM     Read more here: http://forums.xfinity.com/t5/Your-Home-Network/How-to-Secure-a-Wireless-Router/td-p/118586  
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If you're having trouble with connecting Apple Mail or another email application on your Mac, before you troubleshoot any further, make sure you have the right settings in your mail program.   To configure an email client to use Comcast email (@comcast.net), the following settings should be used for sending and receiving email:   Incoming Mail Server Name: imap.comcast.net Incoming Mail Server Port Number: 993 with SSL enabled (recommended) - Only if Needed: 143 with SSL enabled Outgoing Mail Server Name: smtp.comcast.net Outgoing Mail Server Port Number: Recommended: 587 (SMTP, recommended) - Only if Needed: 465 (SMTPS) SSL Encryption: checked Authentication: your full XFINITY email address and password   Configurations for specific email programs can be found at   Using Email Client Programs with Comcast Email.
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If you want to give other members of your household access to your XFINITY account, you can create a distinct username for each of them online. Additional XFINITY Usernames You can add up to six additional XFINITY usernames to your account. To create a new XFINITY username: Sign in to   My Account   as the primary user. Click the   Users   tab at the top of the page.   Underneath the current user portals, select the option to   Add a New User.   Fill out the   Add a New User   form with the new user's information.   On the same page, indicate if the new user is under 12 years old. If so, you must agree to the   COPPA Terms of Service. (Note:   Learn more about   The Children's Online Privacy Protection Act.)   Review the   Terms of Service   and the   Privacy Policy   by clicking on the links provided. If you agree, check the   I have read and agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy   box.   Click   Add user. Note:   When you create a new user, the user won't have any   Permissions   to access or modify account settings and can only utilize some account features, like watching XFINITY TV online and using email (if you have XFINITY TV and Internet). Learn how to   set secondary XFINITY username permissions. 
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This article provides details on how to troubleshoot home WiFi issues with XFINITY xFi. For an overview of the XFINITY xFi web portal ( xfinity.com/myxFi ) and app for mobile devices, see our  web portal and mobile app article . For tips on managing your home network, see  personalizing your home network with XFINITY xFi .   How To Troubleshoot Your Home WiFi Network with XFINITY xFi     xFi Gateway Restart   If you are experiencing home WiFi connectivity issues, you can restart your Gateway from the   Overview   section of the xFi web portal, mobile app or xFi app on X1. Scroll down to   Troubleshooting   and select   Restart. Select   Continue   to confirm. It can take up to 10 minutes to restart your Gateway. During this time, you won't be able to use your home network, connect to the Internet or stream video on certain TV Boxes. If you have XFINITY Voice, you will not be able to make or receive calls, including emergency 911 calls, until your Gateway is back online.     Troubleshoot a Device   If you are having issues with one of the devices connected to your home network, select   Troubleshoot a Device   at the top of the   Overview   section of the web portal or the XFINITY xFi app, then follow the prompts to determine what the issue may be and get tips on how to fix it. First, select the device you wish to troubleshoot. Then, select a specific issue to troubleshoot. The tool will run several health and diagnostic checks to assess whether the connectivity of the device is strong enough to support the function you are trying to perform (surfing the web, streaming video, etc.). If the test reveals that there may be a problem with the connectivity of the device, you will be given relevant troubleshooting tips to improve the connection and signal.
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Question Way too often I am given the message "one moment please with ref code S0a00". It usually occurs around prime time and on the same few channels. What does this mean?   Answer  The S0A00 error is caused by a poor signal at the TV outlet.   Check for loose F connectors on the coax at the back of the box, the TV outlet  and any accessable splitters.  The issue can be outside with a damaged drop cable, loose / corrorded / wet fittins or other coax issues from the pole / ped to the house or upstream into Comcast's RF portion of the plant.    Excessive splitting in the home will cause marginal signal issues like this.  If there are any splitters that can be removed, that will increase the signal to the remaining TV outlets   Error S0A00 could also be caused by your cable box not being active or has somehow lost its activation. If the error does not go away within approximately one hour, determine if the error message is on all your TVs, or just one, and then   contact Comcast   so a representative can assist you.   Comcast support can usually just send a new signal and get it working again. If not, insist on a tech visit. The tech will have the proper test equipment to find and fix the issue.
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If you receive mail that purports to be from Comcast telling you (the following are only a few of the things these emails will tell you)   1) Your account has been blocked 2) There has been unusual activity on your account 3) To update your account 4) To consent to the Electronic Communications Delivery Policy or your account will be deactivated 5) To upgrade your account 6) Constant Guard had been updated and you need to re-log in 7) Your payment is overdue, sign in to Customer Central to confirm your payment 8) Your email address will be deleted 9) Your bill is ready to be viewed. You may get this even though you do not subscribe to Eco Bill. Comcast does send out emails to EcoBill customers. Bogus emails may say this or something similar: ."Please Read! Important message from Comcast"   Dear Comcast Customer, Your June, 2012 Comcast billing statement is ready for viewing. To view your bill, please download and extract the attachment. Enter your User Name and Password, and from the next screen select GO from the VIEW YOUR BILL option.   10) You get an email and the   From   address is   XFINITY.User   or   Comcast.User 11) A mail that purports to be from Comcast   which includes an attachment.    Example:   Download the attachments, complete the payment form to pay your July bill online and get your 50% Discount. 12) To update your credit card information and    your service could be suspended   if you fail to do so 13) There was an issue with your last payment. You are required to validate your payment information in order to avoid service suspension. Update your payment methods. Update your credit card information as soon as possible. 14) The Constant Guard™ service has updated the Online Security of Comcast Users. In order to get the last update click "Accept Terms Now" bellow and  accept the "Terms & Conditions". 15) Security Measure for your Comcast Email Our Security Department has been receiving complains about your email account and we are sending you this notification before we terminate your account. 16) Dear Comcast Mail User, Your E-mail account has exceeded its limit and needs to be verified, if not verified within 24 hours, we shall suspend your account. CLICK HERE to verify your email account now. 17)   Your immediate attention is required.   Constant Guard™ has identified that there is a   unpaid   supplementary fee of   $25.00   on your XFINITY Internet Services. [ Login to Customer Central ] You must Log In as the Administrator/Parent account holder. If payment is not completed by [July 03, 2013] - we will be forced to suspend your account indefinitely. We are currently investigating this issue, if it is a system error, you may disregard this message. 18)   A   DGTFX   Virus has been detected in your Comcast folders and threatens to deactivate your email account if you don't send your email address, full name, password and phone number.   THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS A DGTFX virus. It’s just a string of letters somebody dreamed up to try and make their phishing campaign more believable. If you do a search for it, the only thing that will turn up in the results are numerous "this is a phishing scam". 19) Failure to do anything else that will result in your service being suspended 20)   You have been overcharged by a specific amount which will be listed, I should submit a refund through the email. Comcast does not send out overcharged notices. It will be on your next bill as a credit. 21)   Create your Refund Voucher because you were overcharged on your last bill. Will include links for you to use to sign in. Comcast does not have Refund Vouchers. A credit amount will be deducted from your next bill. Comcast does not send emails for refunds. 22)   On a specific date an email upgrade will go into effect and that you need to upgrade my account before then. Even if there is an upgrade planned you won't have to update anything. These mails usually have a link for the supposed "upgrade" which if filled out will give scammers access to your account. 23)   This is to alert you that you have to store your email information with us so it wont disable your account we have upgraded our system and therefore we are asking our customers fill there email details on-line so as not to   render there email account to be disabled  thank you for your help resolving this matter. You can verify/modify your email information here by clicking link below: 24)   Xfinity will undergo unscheduled system Maintenance today in order to improve your account. The new Zimbra mail 2015 which will be installed on your email account. Your present account will be deactivated to create space for the new web access 2014. Please "told to click link here" to Update Your Mailbox. Your account will be inactive if this survey is not completed.  Thank you. XFINITY Service Center(@)2015.       DO NOT CLICK THE LINKS AND PROVIDE THE INFORMATION.   THESE ARE PHISHING ATTEMPTS. YOU WILL BE GIVING COMPLETE STRANGERS ACCESS TO YOUR ACCOUNT.   There is one way to know 100% if the mail is a phishing attempt.   If the mail contains links that lead to a page wanting your user name, password or any other personal information /asks in the mail for you provide the info   THE MAIL IS NOT FROM COMCAST .       Be suspicious of any email or phone call that asks for your personal account information, such as user names, passwords, and account numbers. Email, phone calls, text messages, instant messages, or Web logs that appear to come from a reliable source may not always be authentic   Be aware that Comcast will NEVER ask you for password information over the phone or email Comcast will NEVER ask for billing or payment information through email   whether by a link or in an attachment.   Comcast does NOT send out disconnect/suspension notices for failure to pay via Email or for anything else you fail to do.   Official  Comcast mail will never be sent with Xfinity.User or Comcast.User as the sender. THESE MAILS ARE PHISHING ATTEMPTS/SCAMS.   They won't include attachments for you to open in order to access your account.   Another sign of a phishing attempt is the sender address. If it contains @ with .2 letters it was sent from a domain outside the United States. An example of this is @uc.cl (which is in a post by a customer who received a phishing attempt from someone using that domain) cl is for Chile.   Each country has a domain code. A good search engine will help you identify the country. Comcast will not send mail from another country domain.   Another thing you can do is look at the headers in the email, which often contain clues that Comcast did not send it. If you don't know how to find the headers, ask us in the forum. Please tell us if you are using Comcast Xfinity Connect (web mail) or an email client. If you use a client we need to know which one you use.   If you use Xfinity Connect (web based) for email access:   Legitimate mail from Comcast will have the Xfinity logo next to mail sent from Comcast.     You can also hover over the   From  line in the Inbox to see where the email message was sent from. If not Comcast or Xfinity, you know it is not legit.   IF YOU USE AN EMAIL CLIENT THE LOGO WILL NOT APPEAR AS SHOWN IN FIRST IMAGE NOR WILL HOVERING OVER THE FROM LINE REVEAL  WHERE THE MAIL WAS SENT FROM.   Also in Xfinity Connect you can hover over the link in the mail and the link URL will appear in your bottom taskbar, usually on the left side.  Hovering over the link in an email client will also show the URL. These URL's are a strong indicator the mail is not legitimate. Learn more about email phishing     Reporting Phishing Issues Please take the following steps to help us investigate the phishing email you received: 1) Copy the email, including headers, and paste it into a new email. 2) Add the words "phishing email" in the subject so that it can be easily identified by our Customer Security Assurance team. 3) Send to   abuse@comcast.net   for further investigation. (DO NOT FORWARD)   A simple forward will not preserve the headers of the original phish mail. Instead the headers will show YOU as the sender.   IF YOU USE AN EMAIL CLIENT, you can forward the message as an attachment. This can generally be done by opening the mail, clicking a drop down arrow next to Forward and choosing As Attachment.   IF YOU POST THE MAIL YOU RECEIVED DO NOT INCLUDE THE LINK.   Many times the links are still active when posted. There are those misguided souls who will click the link just to see what it looks like! Most phishing sites are just that, but a few are also sources of malware.   IF YOU POST THE EMAIL ADDRESS THE MAIL WAS SENT FROM  break the link to make it non-clickable. It should look like this  email address @ wherever.com/net   IF YOU POST HEADERS OF THE MAIL   edit out any user names before @wherever.com/net.   You can also find the most common phishing scams listed on this page   http://constantguard.comcast.net/alerts     Most of this can also apply to mail from other companies such as your bank, credit card company, PayPal, online stores where you have an account, other email accounts you have (ex:hotmail, yahoo, gmail), etc.   They won't ask for your log in information via email either.   Tempted to reply to the mail? DO NOT DO IT. By replying you verify that your email address is valid, which gets it put on a spammers list.   Edit to add: there is a new phish mail making the rounds.   Clues that it is not from Comcast:   1) the links have various things in the address. is-a-liberal, is-a-llama, better-than-tv, is-gone, and various nonsense such as dpyaqlahs or other random letters. Comcast does NOT have these things as part of any of their URL's.   2) this statement "your ability to use any services provided by Comcast such as voice, broadband, wireless, adsl, cable, dialup and email might become restricted".   Comcast does not provide adsl and dialup. 
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We see many questions in the forums regarding port forwarding, so I have put together a primer to try to help those who are new to the concept.   WARNING: Port Forwarding exposes devices on your LAN to the Internet. If you DO NOT NEED to port forward, DON'T. This guide tells you how to and why you might need to port forward. The reader assumes any and all responsibility for any damage of, or intrusions into their network caused by port forwarding. What is Port Forwarding? Port forwarding is a mechanism used in IPv4 to allow a computer, smartphone, or other device (the SOURCE) outside your Comcast HSI connection to connect to a device on your LAN (the DESTINATION). A typical Comcast residential user network might look something like this: In this diagram, a Cable subscriber (you) has a webcam, NAS, or media server on the internal LAN behind his router/gateway. It is configured to listen on TCP port 8080, in this case. Other devices or game servers that you have may be configured to listen on a different (or many different) ports, but the principle is the same. Let's say that the subscriber (you) want to make that server available to a family member in a different location, so they can see your webcam, or look at pictures on your media server or NAS. In order to do that, your family member needs to be able to connect, often using a web browser, or a smartphone app. The problem is that your web server is on your LAN, protected by the firewall in your router, AND it has a private address, which cannot be used on the internet. The private subnets you will see most commonly are the 192.168.0.0 and 10.0.0.0 subnets. Subnetting is beyond the scope of this discussion, as most home routers are set up out-of-the-box to use one of these submets. Under normal circumstances, you will probably never have to change this. The problem lies in the fact that these subnets cannot be routed over the internet. Port Forwarding is intended to solve that problem.   As seen in the diagram, your home router (and you must have a router of some type to perform port forwarding) is provided with an address on the public internet by Comcast. Because of a shortage of IPv4 addresses, home routers use Network Address Translation (NAT) to allow you to connect a large number of devices to your router, and give them the ability to connect to other devices on the internet. This is done by assigning each requested connection from your LAN a TCP port, so the router can track the connection. The combination of the IP address and port number is called a socket. So, when you use your computer on your LAN to go to www.google.com, your computer (the source) sends a request using a random port (usually above port 1024) to the destination (www.google.com) on port 80 (the standard http port. Because of NAT, the Google server sees your source address as the WAN IP of your router. How, you may ask. is this related to Port Forwarding? Well, port forwarding is essentially the same process, but in reverse. Think of it as inbound NAT. You router has a public IP address, but by default, it doesn't listen on many ports. This is for security, so that someone on the internet cannot easily get on to your network. Now, you have a media server or an IP Camera that you want Granny to see, so you have to tell your router to listen on a port so that you can give Granny a link to it that she can put in her web browser (how she does that we will discuss later).   How do I set up Port Forwarding   First, you have to set up your router. There is an excellent website at http://portforward.com, which will walk you through the steps of how to forward ports on just about every known router, so I am not going to go into detail on any particular model. Suffice to say that when you set up port forwarding, you tell your router to listen on a particular port (in the case of the diagram, it is port 8080), and you also tell it where to send that traffic, when it sees it. In this case, the router is told to send all traffic it ses incoming on port 8080 to the internal device at 192.168.1.200. Below is an example of the screen for configuring a Custom port forwarding service on a Netgear WNDR3700. Other router screens will look different. This is just one example:   OK, so I have set it up...how does Granny get there... Granny has a computer with a web browser. Lets say you are letting her see your IP Camera. instead of port 80, your IP Camera is designed to listen on port 8080. Under normal circumstances, you would forward the same port externally as the device listens on, so you would set up your port forwarding to listen on the WAN interface on port 8080, and internally, send all port 8080 traffic to the IP address of your IP camera. Now, when Granny browses google.com, she just types inwww.google.com in her browser, and it goes there, right? That is because google.com is listening on a well-known port for http traffic (port 80), and browsers automatically know that you want to go to port 80. What they don't know is that your router is waiting to send traffic to your IP Camera on port 8080, so when you tell Granny how to get to your camera, if you are using any port other that 80, you MUST specify the port, and that you are using the http protocol. So, you would tell granny to put the following in her browser address bar: http://<yourWANIP>:8080   To find the WAN IP of your router, you can either look at the Status page in your router interface, or browse tohttp://whatismyip.com If you don't want to give her an IP address, you would need to use some type of Dynamic DNS service (not within the scope of this discussion) to translate your WAN IP into a hostname, but you still need to specify http and the port number, like this: http://myipcam.somedomain.org:2000 (the actual name will depend on your Dynamic DNS provider) What else can I do with Port Forwarding?   The principles are the same for pretty much any device or server that you want to make available to sources outside your home. You can port forward Windows Remote Desktop Protocol, so you can log into your PC from another device with an RDP client. You can run a web server (although publicly accessible webservers are technically against the Comcast AUP for residential connections), you can access your own media server from your smartphone, so you can listen to your music wherever you are...the possibilities are pretty much endless, BUT make sure that you secure the devices you are allowing access to with strong passwords. While many security experts frown upon the concept of 'Security by Obscurity' I personally don't see that it hurts to change the port you are using for some services, especially the more common ones...Any hacker knows that Windows Remote Desktop Protocol runs on port 3389, so instead of setting your port forwarding up to listen on port 3389 on the WAN IP, use a different port (above 1024 is recommended. The highest you can go is 65535). You can still tell the router to forward the traffic to port 3389, so you don't have to mess around with the registry settings for your RDP setup on your Windows machine. That is basic port forwarding in brief. If you have any questions, please post it in the forums in the Home Networking / Router / & WiFi Gateway Help board and we will try to help. Be aware that as of writing this (April 2013) there appear to be some issues with port forwarding on some of the Comcast supplied gateway devices. Unfortunately, there isn't much we can do to remedy those, if you have set up port forwarding properly. The suggested solution is to have the gateway placed in bridge mode, and buy your own router to do your port forwarding. Also there are some quirks to setting up port forwarding on the SBG6580 gateway. See this post for details: http://forums.comcast.com/t5/Home-Networking-Router-WiFi/Port-Forwarding-for-an-IP-Camera/m-p/152957... ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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If using Windows 10's new browser EDGE, you will need to do the following to set your homepage.   Select   More   (…) on the address bar, then   Settings. Under   Open with,   select   A specific page or pages. Choose one of the default options or select   Custom   to enter the URL of another page you’d like to see each time you open the browser. To save, select the plus button.
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You can still IMPORT your favorites in EDGE.   Go into Edge's settings, at the bottom click on View Favorite Settings,   Turn ON the Show The Favorites Bar, and then select your old browser and click on IMPORT.  This will import your old favorites and populate EDGEs Favorite bar.  You may need to do some maintenance/cleanup to get them to show the way you would like.  Good luck!   
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