Xfinity plant
Xfinity globe
Community Forum

Internet

Top Contributors
Sort by:
This article provides information and links if you  think your computer is infected.
View full article
This article will explain what port forwarding is and how to use it on your in-home network. 
View full article
How to import your Favorites into Windows EDGE Browser
View full article
EXPORT   Identity Safe Data If you use Identity Safe, before you uninstall NSS you will want to go into Settings > Identity Protection > Log into Identity Safe by clicking on Configure (if not already logged-in) You will be interested in the Export Data option - you can click on Configure and will be permitted to browse your system for a location to save the data to.  You can create an Identity Safe BU folder in my Documents or on your desktop - but the choice of location is yours.  Select a location you will remember.   IMPORT   Identity Safe Data. Once NSS is installed, go back to the Identity Protection Settings page (above) and Select Import Data by clicking configure.  If you set a password when you saved the data, enter that password, the location of where you saved the data and then click OK.  Your Identity Safe data should be restored to what you had before you uninstalled Norton.
View full article
This article tells you how to troubleshoot your WiFi Network using XFINITY xFi
View full article
Congressional Review Act (CRA) Bill- Comcast Consumer Privacy
View full article
We see many questions in the forums regarding port forwarding, so I have put together a primer to try to help those who are new to the concept.   WARNING: Port Forwarding exposes devices on your LAN to the Internet. If you DO NOT NEED to port forward, DON'T. This guide tells you how to and why you might need to port forward. The reader assumes any and all responsibility for any damage of, or intrusions into their network caused by port forwarding. What is Port Forwarding? Port forwarding is a mechanism used in IPv4 to allow a computer, smartphone, or other device (the SOURCE) outside your Comcast HSI connection to connect to a device on your LAN (the DESTINATION). A typical Comcast residential user network might look something like this: In this diagram, a Cable subscriber (you) has a webcam, NAS, or media server on the internal LAN behind his router/gateway. It is configured to listen on TCP port 8080, in this case. Other devices or game servers that you have may be configured to listen on a different (or many different) ports, but the principle is the same. Let's say that the subscriber (you) want to make that server available to a family member in a different location, so they can see your webcam, or look at pictures on your media server or NAS. In order to do that, your family member needs to be able to connect, often using a web browser, or a smartphone app. The problem is that your web server is on your LAN, protected by the firewall in your router, AND it has a private address, which cannot be used on the internet. The private subnets you will see most commonly are the 192.168.0.0 and 10.0.0.0 subnets. Subnetting is beyond the scope of this discussion, as most home routers are set up out-of-the-box to use one of these submets. Under normal circumstances, you will probably never have to change this. The problem lies in the fact that these subnets cannot be routed over the internet. Port Forwarding is intended to solve that problem.   As seen in the diagram, your home router (and you must have a router of some type to perform port forwarding) is provided with an address on the public internet by Comcast. Because of a shortage of IPv4 addresses, home routers use Network Address Translation (NAT) to allow you to connect a large number of devices to your router, and give them the ability to connect to other devices on the internet. This is done by assigning each requested connection from your LAN a TCP port, so the router can track the connection. The combination of the IP address and port number is called a socket. So, when you use your computer on your LAN to go to www.google.com, your computer (the source) sends a request using a random port (usually above port 1024) to the destination (www.google.com) on port 80 (the standard http port. Because of NAT, the Google server sees your source address as the WAN IP of your router. How, you may ask. is this related to Port Forwarding? Well, port forwarding is essentially the same process, but in reverse. Think of it as inbound NAT. You router has a public IP address, but by default, it doesn't listen on many ports. This is for security, so that someone on the internet cannot easily get on to your network. Now, you have a media server or an IP Camera that you want Granny to see, so you have to tell your router to listen on a port so that you can give Granny a link to it that she can put in her web browser (how she does that we will discuss later).   How do I set up Port Forwarding   First, you have to set up your router. There is an excellent website at http://portforward.com, which will walk you through the steps of how to forward ports on just about every known router, so I am not going to go into detail on any particular model. Suffice to say that when you set up port forwarding, you tell your router to listen on a particular port (in the case of the diagram, it is port 8080), and you also tell it where to send that traffic, when it sees it. In this case, the router is told to send all traffic it ses incoming on port 8080 to the internal device at 192.168.1.200. Below is an example of the screen for configuring a Custom port forwarding service on a Netgear WNDR3700. Other router screens will look different. This is just one example:   OK, so I have set it up...how does Granny get there... Granny has a computer with a web browser. Lets say you are letting her see your IP Camera. instead of port 80, your IP Camera is designed to listen on port 8080. Under normal circumstances, you would forward the same port externally as the device listens on, so you would set up your port forwarding to listen on the WAN interface on port 8080, and internally, send all port 8080 traffic to the IP address of your IP camera. Now, when Granny browses google.com, she just types inwww.google.com in her browser, and it goes there, right? That is because google.com is listening on a well-known port for http traffic (port 80), and browsers automatically know that you want to go to port 80. What they don't know is that your router is waiting to send traffic to your IP Camera on port 8080, so when you tell Granny how to get to your camera, if you are using any port other that 80, you MUST specify the port, and that you are using the http protocol. So, you would tell granny to put the following in her browser address bar: http://<yourWANIP>:8080   To find the WAN IP of your router, you can either look at the Status page in your router interface, or browse tohttp://whatismyip.com If you don't want to give her an IP address, you would need to use some type of Dynamic DNS service (not within the scope of this discussion) to translate your WAN IP into a hostname, but you still need to specify http and the port number, like this: http://myipcam.somedomain.org:2000 (the actual name will depend on your Dynamic DNS provider) What else can I do with Port Forwarding?   The principles are the same for pretty much any device or server that you want to make available to sources outside your home. You can port forward Windows Remote Desktop Protocol, so you can log into your PC from another device with an RDP client. You can run a web server (although publicly accessible webservers are technically against the Comcast AUP for residential connections), you can access your own media server from your smartphone, so you can listen to your music wherever you are...the possibilities are pretty much endless, BUT make sure that you secure the devices you are allowing access to with strong passwords. While many security experts frown upon the concept of 'Security by Obscurity' I personally don't see that it hurts to change the port you are using for some services, especially the more common ones...Any hacker knows that Windows Remote Desktop Protocol runs on port 3389, so instead of setting your port forwarding up to listen on port 3389 on the WAN IP, use a different port (above 1024 is recommended. The highest you can go is 65535). You can still tell the router to forward the traffic to port 3389, so you don't have to mess around with the registry settings for your RDP setup on your Windows machine. That is basic port forwarding in brief. If you have any questions, please post it in the forums in the Home Networking / Router / & WiFi Gateway Help board and we will try to help. Be aware that as of writing this (April 2013) there appear to be some issues with port forwarding on some of the Comcast supplied gateway devices. Unfortunately, there isn't much we can do to remedy those, if you have set up port forwarding properly. The suggested solution is to have the gateway placed in bridge mode, and buy your own router to do your port forwarding. Also there are some quirks to setting up port forwarding on the SBG6580 gateway. See this post for details: http://forums.comcast.com/t5/Home-Networking-Router-WiFi/Port-Forwarding-for-an-IP-Camera/m-p/152957... ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
View full article
How do I log into my XFINITY modem so I can manage my home network?
View full article
This article provides information on how to complete your XFINITY Wireless Gateway Self Install and Activation
View full article
Activating an Xfinity Wireless Gateway This article guides you through the steps to install and activate your Xfinity Gateway. If you are replacing a device that is currently installed in your home, be sure to disconnect that device before following the steps below. Place Your Gateway Find the cable and power outlets most centrally located in your home. Place your Gateway off of the floor and in an open area away from exterior walls, metal surfaces, microwaves, and windows. Avoid cramped spaces and anything that can block the device from broadcasting freely.   Plug in Your Gateway Plug the power cord into your Gateway and then into an electrical outlet. Screw one end of the coaxial cable into the Cable In/RF In port on your Gateway and the other end into the cable wall outlet. Make sure the connections are finger tight. If you subscribe to Xfinity Voice service, connect your telephone to the   Tel 1   connection on your Gateway using a telephone cord.   Wait for Your Gateway to be Ready Your Gateway may reboot, and it could take up to 20 minutes for it to be ready to activate. Make sure the lights appear as described below before moving on to the next step. Do not unplug your Gateway during this process. If your Gateway has multiple lights on the front, the   Power,   US/DS, and   Online   lights should remain solid for at least one minute and the   WiFi   light(s) should start blinking. If your Gateway has only one light, it should remain solid white for at least a minute.   Establish a Temporary Internet Connection to Activate If you prefer to use a smartphone, tablet, or laptop with WiFi connection: Look for the Network Name (SSID) and Password printed on the side, back, or bottom of your Gateway (the name should look like Home-XXXX or XFSETUP-XXXX). Select the name from the list of available networks on your WiFi-enabled device and enter the password when prompted. If you're prompted to enter a PIN instead of a password, click the   Connect Using a Security Key   link to enter the password found on the Gateway. If you prefer to use an Ethernet connection: Plug the Ethernet cable into one of the open ports on your Gateway until it clicks. Plug the other end into the Ethernet port of your computer. The Ethernet port will light up when successfully connected.   Activate Your Gateway Once you've established a temporary Internet connection, if you're not automatically presented with a welcome message to begin setup, open a web browser and navigate to   xfinity.com/activate. Follow the on-screen prompts to verify your Xfinity account and complete the activation process. When you've finished activation, your Gateway may reboot. It may take up to 10 minutes after activation before you can connect to your home network.   Connect to Your Home Network After the Gateway has been activated and after a possible reboot, you may need to connect your devices to your home network if you changed the network name and password. Go to the WiFi settings on your WiFi-enabled devices (e.g., smartphone, smart TV, laptop). Select your home network WiFi name and connect with the password. If you changed this during or after activation, be sure to use the new one you set up. Note:   The Xfinity WiFi home hotspot may take up to 24 hours to broadcast. For more information, please see   Questions about the Xfinity WiFi Home Hotspot.     If you're activating an Xfinity xFi Gateway (models Arris 1682G, Cisco 3941T, Technicolor CGM4140COM, or Arris TG3482G), you can use the steps below or download the Xfinity xFi app on the Apple App Store or on Google Play for an easy, guided setup process. To determine the type of Gateway you have, check the make and model information located on the bottom of your device. You can also check this information in  My Account .     Activating an XFINITY xFi Gateway with the XFINITY xFi App   Activation Instructions Launch the XFINITY xFi app and sign in using your XFINITY username and password. (You must be the   primary or an unrestricted secondary user   to access.)   Select   I'm setting up my Wireless Gateway. After activation you can continue to use the XFINITY xFi app to manage your home network.   Select   Get Started   to begin the process of setting up your Gateway. The entire process should not take longer than 20 minutes.   First, we'll need to identify your Gateway. Select   Use Camera   to scan the QR code on the side or back of the device. The QR code should contain all of the information needed to begin activation. You may also be prompted to grant the XFINITY xFi app permission to access your smartphone's camera.   Note:   If your device does not have a QR code to scan, you will need to enter the 12-digit CM MAC number found on the side or back of the Gateway. Select   Enter Code Manually   and follow the on-screen prompts. You may also be prompted to enter the CM MAC number even if your device has a QR code if we need additional information. Your smartphone's camera will open within the XFINITY xFi app. Find the QR code and focus the camera on it. Once the QR code has been successfully scanned, you will see a green check mark.   Note:   Keep your smartphone as steady as possible. If the camera has trouble focusing on the QR code, try slowly moving your smartphone away from and towards the QR code. The app will then take you through the necessary steps to set up your Gateway and activate your XFINITY Internet/XFINITY Voice service. For the best WiFi coverage, set up the device in the most centrally located place in your home where there is also a cable outlet. Also, avoid placing the device in your basement or attic as this can interfere with your WiFi signal. Keep it out of cabinets or closets, and make sure it is off of the floor. Select   Next   to proceed through these tips. Once you've found the best spot for your Gateway, follow the instructions to connect the coaxial cable and power cord. The lights on the front of your Gateway will flash and blink as the device prepares for activation. Select   Ready to Go!   to continue.   Now that your Gateway is connected, it's time to personalize your home WiFi network name and password. Enter a WiFi name and password that is easy to remember and secure. Select   Next.   Confirm the WiFi name and password you entered are correct. If you need to make changes, simply select the back arrow in the top left-hand corner of the screen. If you are also activating XFINITY Voice, you will see your phone number on this screen. Select   Confirm and Finish Up. Note:   For customers swapping an existing xFi Gateway with a new one, you may be presented with the WiFi name and password associated with your previous device. You can choose to keep them the same, or create a new WiFi name and password. If you change the name/password, you'll need to reconnect all your devices using the new information.   Your home network setup will now begin. This part of the process can take up to 10 minutes to complete, during which time you will see status updates at the top of the screen. You will also be prompted to enable push notifications to be alerted when activation is complete.   Once your Gateway is activated and your WiFi is ready to go, you'll be presented with instructions on how to connect to your new WiFi network. Two shortcuts are provided to make this process even easier. Simply copy your WiFi password to your clipboard by selecting   Copy   and then   Go to Settings. From there, go to the WiFi settings on your device, wait for your new WiFi name to show in the list of available networks, join the network and then paste your password to connect.   **NOTE**: Remember, you'll need to connect all of your WiFi-enabled devices using the WiFi name and password you created.
View full article
  For those of you who have an anti-virus/security program/suite installed on your system, it is important to remove those programs prior to installing NSS.  It is recommended that the programs first be removed via Control Panel > Add/Remove Programs.  Once the program is removed, do a search for a Removal Tool for that program.  Many programs have removal tools available and insure a more thorough removal of the old program and a better chance of a clean install of NSS.   Here is a suggested link to assist with the removal: http://support.kaspersky.com/us/consumer/tools-utilities?_ga=1.54697835.1371605271.1460378651   Insure your Windows Firewall is turned on.   Turn off all your remaining anti-malware tools (except Windows Firewall) and reboot.   The Norton Security Suite,is available only for Comcast High Speed Internet customers.  You can go to the “Get Comcast Norton”  page   http://constantguard.comcast.net/norton?cid=NET_33_601 and confirm each of the prerequisites listed there and the minimum system requirements on subsequent pages. You may be required to logon with a Comcast.net Identifier that you use for Comcast Email or for this Forum before you download.   Please follow the instructions for installation and view the video for more clarification.   Once installation is complete, open NSS and manually Run LiveUpdate (located on drop-down under PC Security left side of main page of NSS) as many times as necessary for it to respond "no more updates available". If a reboot is requested, reboot and then continue to Run LiveUpdate until it responds "no more updates available" and then reboot one last time.  Your installation should now be up to date definition wise and ready for use.   If any problems/questions feel free to start a new thread on the Anti-Virus Software & Internet Security Board and we'll provide assistance.
View full article
 I have no Internet access and  the US and DS buttons on the modem are blinking. How do I solve this?
View full article
Please note:  These instructions should also be followed if changing from one Norton product to another. ie a paid/trial subscription from Norton to the Comcast version, or a version upgrade of NSS which is more than one upgrade old.   If you use Identity Safe, backup your Identity Safe data (See Export instructions here-   http://forums.comcast.net/t5/Security-and-Anti-Virus/How-to-Export-Import-NSS-Identity-Safe-Data/m-p...     Uninstall NSS via normal removal procedures. (Add/Remove programs )   After it is uninstalled, run the Norton Remove and Reinstall Tool following the instructions here:  http://us.norton.com/support/kb/web_view.jsp?wv_type=public_web&selected_nav=partner&pvid=&docurl=20...   After running the Removal Tool, reboot and download and install a fresh copy of NSS from here:  http://constantguard.comcast.net/norton?cid=NET_33_601   Once installation is complete, open NSS and manually Run LiveUpdate (located on drop-down under PC Security on left side of main page of NSS) as many times as necessary for it to respond "no more updates available". If a reboot is requested, reboot and then continue to Run LiveUpdate until it responds "no more updates available" and then reboot one last time.  Your installation should now be up to date definition wise and ready for use.   After installation and update, complete the Import portion of the instructions here for Identity Safe Data here -   http://forums.comcast.net/t5/Security-and-Anti-Virus/How-to-Export-Import-NSS-Identity-Safe-Data/m-p...
View full article
 This article provides details on the personalization and control features available with XFINITY xFi. For more information on the xFi web portal and app for mobile devices, see our   xFi portal and app overview article. For xFi troubleshooting tips, see   troubleshooting WiFi connectivity.   Devices   How To Manage Devices with XFINITY xFi   In the   Devices   section, you can view all devices that are currently or were previously connected to your home network. Active   devices are those currently connected to your home network. Paused   devices are those whose WiFi access is currently paused. Inactive   devices are those which are not currently connected to your home network.   Identifying Devices When a device first connects to your home network, the default name of the device, which is either the manufacturer-set name (i.e., hostname or MAC address) or the one you gave your device when you first set it up, will be displayed. If you do not recognize a device: Select the device, then select   Device Details   to see the manufacturer. If the device is connected to your home network, there should be a green dot indicating that it's online, which may also help with identifying what device it is. Access the hostname or MAC address in your device's settings. If the default name displayed is a long string of numbers and letters, it's likely the MAC address.   Personalizing and Organizing Devices You can personalize a device name for easier reference. Select the device to give it a nickname and choose an icon, then assign the device to a profile. If you have devices connected to your home network that still need to be personalized, you'll see that indicated at the top of the   Devices   section. Simply select   Personalize   to nickname and assign to a profile.   Device Indicators A   green dot   indicates the device is currently connected to your home network.   A   pause symbol   indicates the device is currently paused and cannot access your home network.   A   crescent moon symbol   indicates the device is currently in Bedtime Mode.   A   grayed-out device   icon means the device is not currently connected to your home network.     Removing Devices You can remove an inactive (disconnected) device from the   Devices   section by selecting the name of the device, then   Device Details > Forget Device. This will remove the device from the   Devices   section and unassign it from the profile it was associated with, if applicable. It will also permanently delete all historical network activity of this device. If the device reconnects to your home network, it will appear as a new device.     Pausing Devices Pausing a device blocks it from accessing the Internet when connected to your home network. In-progress activity might not stop immediately. Access to local network devices (like printers) and connections that use cellular data or other WiFi networks won't be paused. To pause an individual device simply select the device and then select   Pause Device. You can either pause the device for a specific amount of time (for example, 30 minutes, one hour or two hours) or indefinitely until you choose to unpause the device. When attempting to access the Internet on a paused device, the user will see the device's default message that the site cannot be reached or that it is not connected to the Internet.   How To Pause Devices with XFINITY xFi Note:   If you've previously set up a device block from your Gateway's Admin Tool (http://10.0.0.1), you should see the device listed with a pause icon in xFi indicating WiFi access over your home network is already paused. Once you Pause/Unpause a device or access Bedtime Mode or Port Forwarding through xFi, you will no longer be able to access similar features (block, scheduled block or port forwarding) through the Gateway's Admin Tool (http://10.0.0.1).   People   How To Manage People and Profiles with XFINITY xFi     In the   People   section, you can organize all of your connected devices by the people who use them. Once you've created profiles, you'll be able to access additional features to manage your home network, including the ability to set Parental Controls.   Creating Profiles You can manage devices connected to your home network more efficiently by assigning them to a profile. Create a profile for an individual (e.g., John, Mom) or group (e.g., Kids), then assign their devices to that profile. You can create profiles from the   People   section by selecting   Create Profile, or during the process of naming a device in the   Devices   section. After you create a profile, it will appear in the   People   section. For all the devices assigned to that profile, you can view how active they are on your home network, see which devices are online, instantly pause WiFi access, set a bedtime, and enable Parental Controls. In addition to the custom profiles you create, we provide two profiles for you to use: Household   - can be used to assign smart home devices (e.g., Smart TV, thermostat, security system, door locks) Guest   - can be used to assign visitors' devices These profiles will only appear in the   People   section if a device is assigned to them; they cannot be deleted.   Pause All Devices You can block a profile or group of devices from accessing the Internet when connected to your home network by selecting   Pause All. You can either pause the devices for a specific amount of time (for example, 30 minutes, one hour or two hours) or indefinitely until you choose to unpause the devices. Once a profile is paused, any new device assigned to that profile will be paused. Please note that any in-progress activity might not stop immediately. Additional details about pausing a device are included   above.   Bedtime Mode Bedtime Mode allows you to automatically pause WiFi access over your home network during scheduled times for all devices assigned to a profile. For example, you can pause kids' WiFi access during dinnertime or bedtime. Different schedules can be set for school nights (Sunday - Thursday) and weekends (Friday - Saturday). To set Bedtime Mode, select a profile, then select   Edit   next to   Bedtime Mode. Select the desired nights for Bedtime Mode and the   sleep   and   wake   times. All devices assigned to that profile will then be paused during the sleep times selected. Note:   If you've previously set up a scheduled block for a device(s) from your Gateway's Admin Tool (http://10.0.0.1), you should be alerted when you attempt to set up Bedtime Mode that your prior settings will be cleared. Once you access Bedtime Mode, Pause/Unpause a device or access Port Forwarding through xFi, you will no longer be able to access similar features (scheduled block, block or port forwarding) through the Gateway's Admin Tool (http://10.0.0.1).   How To Set Bedtimes and Manage Parental Controls with XFINITY xFi Parental Controls Parental Controls help reduce the risk of children accessing age-inappropriate content from their devices. To set Parental Controls, select a profile, then select   Edit   next to   Parental Controls. Next, select   On   to only allow access to content deemed appropriate for all ages. The following third-party settings are applied to profiles that have xFi Parental Controls enabled: Google SafeSearch: On Bing SafeSearch: Strict YouTube Restricted Mode: On If a device assigned to that profile attempts to access a website or app known to host inappropriate content for that level, a block page will be displayed. In the case of secure websites or mobile applications, the block page may not be displayed, but access is still prevented.   Home Network Activity In addition to viewing aggregate network activity for all profiles and devices on your home network in the   Overview   section, you can view activity for individual devices and profiles. Simply select a device or profile to view network activity over the past 24 hours and the past 30 days.
View full article
This article provides you with some tips for troubleshooting your XFINITY Internet connection
View full article
This article explains what XFINITY On Demand is and how to use it
View full article
This article helps explains how to tell when a "Comcast" email is real or fraud
View full article
How to connect to an Xfinity WiFi Hotspot
View full article
Learn about what a home network is and why you need one.
View full article
If you use Identity Safe, backup your Identity Safe data See Export instructions here  http://forums.comcast.net/t5/Security-and-Anti-Virus/How-to-Export-Import-NSS-Identity-Safe-Data/m-p...     Uninstall NSS via normal removal procedures. (Add/Remove programs ) Please Note:  During the uninstall of NSS, you should select the top option "I plan to reinstall a Norton Product in the future.  Please leave my settings behind."  The reason for the backup (Export/Import of ID Safe data) is a safety factor.     Follow the instructions found here:  http://constantguard.comcast.net/norton?cid=NET_33_601 to download and install a fresh copy of NSS.   Once installation is complete, open NSS and manually Run LiveUpdate (located on drop-down under PC Security on left side of main page of NSS) as many times as necessary for it to respond "no more updates available". If a reboot is requested, reboot and then continue to Run LiveUpdate until it responds "no more updates available" and then reboot one last time.  Your installation should now be up to date definition wise and ready for use.   After installation and update,if your Identity Safe data was not reinstalled, complete the Import portion of the instructions here for Identity Safe Data   http://forums.comcast.net/t5/Security-and-Anti-Virus/How-to-Export-Import-NSS-Identity-Safe-Data/m-p...
View full article