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System ground

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System ground

My recent service install has a grounding (earthing) issue.  The grounding connection was made with a #12AWG solid conductor.  NFPA requires minimum #6AWG.  Also, the grounding connection was made to the utility meter box, which is fed via PVC conduit, thus not completing the current carrying metallic connection to ground.  The result is that I have two separate grounding locations which will obviously cause a rise ground potential and potentially destroy all electrical/electronic devices should lightning or any other overvoltage occur.  A neighbor across the street has the same Xfinity configuration.  Is this common?  It IS a violation of the National Electric Code, and a really bad idea technically.  Any suggestions?

Accepted Solution

Re: System ground


@morgal48 wrote:

My recent service install has a grounding (earthing) issue.  The grounding connection was made with a #12AWG solid conductor.  NFPA requires minimum #6AWG. 

 

 

Also, the grounding connection was made to the utility meter box, which is fed via PVC conduit, thus not completing the current carrying metallic connection to ground. 

 

The result is that I have two separate grounding locations which will obviously cause a rise ground potential and potentially destroy all electrical/electronic devices should lightning or any other overvoltage occur.  A neighbor across the street has the same Xfinity configuration.  Is this common?  It IS a violation of the National Electric Code, and a really bad idea technically.  Any suggestions?


Coax systems are not grounded to earth ground, but rather are bonded to your home's electrical system. The idea is to equalize the potential between the coax system and the electrical system. 14 AWG is acceptable for this application, but Comcast typically uses 12 or 10 AWG. 

 

It's fine to bond to the meter box. Conduit isn't used as a grounding apparatus anyhow.  

 

Coax bonding/grounding is not meant to protect against surges or lightning strikes, that is not it's purpose. 

 

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Cable Expert

Re: System ground


@morgal48 wrote:

My recent service install has a grounding (earthing) issue.  The grounding connection was made with a #12AWG solid conductor.  NFPA requires minimum #6AWG. 

 

 

Also, the grounding connection was made to the utility meter box, which is fed via PVC conduit, thus not completing the current carrying metallic connection to ground. 

 

The result is that I have two separate grounding locations which will obviously cause a rise ground potential and potentially destroy all electrical/electronic devices should lightning or any other overvoltage occur.  A neighbor across the street has the same Xfinity configuration.  Is this common?  It IS a violation of the National Electric Code, and a really bad idea technically.  Any suggestions?


Coax systems are not grounded to earth ground, but rather are bonded to your home's electrical system. The idea is to equalize the potential between the coax system and the electrical system. 14 AWG is acceptable for this application, but Comcast typically uses 12 or 10 AWG. 

 

It's fine to bond to the meter box. Conduit isn't used as a grounding apparatus anyhow.  

 

Coax bonding/grounding is not meant to protect against surges or lightning strikes, that is not it's purpose. 

 




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Regular Visitor

Re: System ground

Are you certain?  Seems that around 2007 the NFPA changed grounding requirements.  That edition of the Code, as I recall or mis-recall (haven't opened a Code book since I retired), requires all individual electrical systems to be grounded to a common location - many grounding companies developed and sell a device for that specific purpose.  Not sure how "bonding" is accomplished since both the ground and neutral bars are located inside the panel, and that meter box must have some dielectric to prevent electric shock.  That leaves one with an ungrounded control voltage system next to a grounded low voltage power system.  That just doesn't seem like a good idea.  Do AHJs approve of that?  Not being onrey, just that I have some #6 bare copper that I could bond the two systems together with.  But I'm old and really don't won't to dig around that ground rod unless I really need to.

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